Nature: Great Barrier Reef coral cluster slowly dies due to ocean heat waves.

category:Global
 Nature: Great Barrier Reef coral cluster slowly dies due to ocean heat waves.


On April 19, 2018, albinism occurred on coral in Australias Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Visual Chinese map Great Barrier Reef is the largest and longest coral reef in the world, with unique scientific research conditions. But global warming has caused a rising temperature of the sea water, causing a serious whitening of the coral reefs, which have a fatal impact on these fragile ecosystems. Driven by a record high temperature in the El Nino event from 2015 to 2016, the most severe albinism occurred in 2016, affecting more than 90% of Great Barrier Reef corals. This time, Terry Huges, a researcher at the James Cook University, and his colleagues, drew the geographical distribution of heat exposure after the extreme ocean heat wave in 2016, and the resulting coral death of 2300 kilometers along the Great Barrier Reef. They found that many corals died immediately because of the high temperature, but some of them still died slowly after the yellow algae, which were associated with the corals. Coral death is associated with albinism and heat exposure levels, especially in northern Great Barrier Reef, where 1/3 of coral is most severely damaged. Coral deaths also lead to dramatic changes in the composition and functional properties of coral clusters of hundreds of single coral reefs, and the original and diversified coral clusters have degenerated. The research team said that albino coral clusters are not likely to be reversed, and many of the surviving coral groups are still dying slowly, and even fast growing corals will take at least ten years to update. In addition, the Great Barrier Reef experienced severe albinism again in 2017, resulting in further damage. Therefore, scientists conclude that coral reefs in the tropics may continue to degenerate until the climate changes to stabilize the remainder of the population into a heat-resistant coral cluster. These findings further suggest that if the world is unable to limit global warming to 1.5 - 2 degrees centigrade before the pre - industrial level, it is necessary for humans to reexamine the risk of the collapse of the coral reef ecosystem. Source: ScienceDaily daily - editor in charge of China Science and Technology Net: Cheng Gang _NN7377 This time, Terry Huges, a researcher at the James Cook University, and his colleagues, drew the geographical distribution of heat exposure after the extreme ocean heat wave in 2016, and the resulting coral death of 2300 kilometers along the Great Barrier Reef. They found that many corals died immediately because of the high temperature, but some of them still died slowly after the yellow algae, which were associated with the corals. Coral death is associated with albinism and heat exposure levels, especially in northern Great Barrier Reef, where 1/3 of coral is most severely damaged. Coral deaths also lead to dramatic changes in the composition and functional properties of coral clusters of hundreds of single coral reefs, and the original and diversified coral clusters have degenerated. The research team said that albino coral clusters are not likely to be reversed, and many of the surviving coral groups are still dying slowly, and even fast growing corals will take at least ten years to update. In addition, the Great Barrier Reef experienced severe albinism again in 2017, resulting in further damage. Therefore, scientists conclude that coral reefs in the tropics may continue to degenerate until the climate changes to stabilize the remainder of the population into a heat-resistant coral cluster. These findings further suggest that if the world is unable to limit global warming to 1.5 - 2 degrees centigrade before the pre - industrial level, it is necessary for humans to reexamine the risk of the collapse of the coral reef ecosystem.