Trump insisted on nuclear rod US $90 billion to update nuclear arsenal

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 Trump insisted on nuclear rod US $90 billion to update nuclear arsenal


Reported that the United States National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) announced in the fiscal year 2019 nuclear stockpile and management plan, listed the next 25 years need to promote the development and renewal of nuclear warheads. Although NNSA is only responsible for the development, maintenance and disposal of nuclear warheads and does not undertake the construction of nuclear strike and delivery weapons such as aircraft, ships and missiles, the basic investment in nuclear arsenals, such as facilities construction, nuclear safety and protection equipment, is a huge financial black hole.

The plan shows that it may take 25 years for the United States to renew its nuclear arsenal, with a high investment of $61.1 billion to $90.7 billion. Taking into account the high cost of new cruise missiles, intercontinental missiles and nuclear bombers, the total cost of renewing the U.S. nuclear arsenal would be higher.

Defense News believes that the soaring cost of renewal of the U.S. nuclear arsenal is partly due to the Trump Administrations nuclear posture assessment report. In response to the so-called nuclear posture threat, the United States announced two new nuclear warhead research and development plans, and announced that the land, sea and air trinity nuclear arsenal would be fully updated.

In terms of sea-based nuclear weapons, the United States not only needs to update the W76-1 submarine-launched nuclear warhead for the Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile, but also invests $65 million to develop a new type of W76-2 nuclear warhead and promote the latest modification plan for another W88 nuclear warhead. In the area of space-based nuclear weapons, the United States will develop and produce B61-12 nuclear warheads, which can be mounted on B-2, B-21 bombers and F-15, F-16, F-35 fighters. In terms of land-based nuclear weapons, the new generation of intercontinental ballistic missiles will use retrofitted W78 nuclear warheads. The next step to replace the new BM-Y and BM-Z nuclear warheads of W78 will be costly. BM-Y will cost between $12.7 billion and $18.9 billion, and BM-Z will cost an estimated $14.2 billion to $20.6 billion. Despite NNSAs claim that the investment needed for nuclear arsenal updating is within the scope of affordability and implementation, Kingston Reeve, a member of the Arms Control Association of the United States, said the plan reflects the fact that NNSA is overburdened with nuclear arsenal updating. The US accountability bureau also expressed concern that NNSAs limited budget would not meet the demand. Bao Huadong (source): Global Times - World Wide Web. More brilliant, please log on to World Wide Web http://www.huanqiu.com responsible editor: Zhao Nan _NBJS6829

In terms of sea-based nuclear weapons, the United States not only needs to update the W76-1 submarine-launched nuclear warhead for the Trident submarine-launched ballistic missile, but also invests $65 million to develop a new type of W76-2 nuclear warhead and promote the latest modification plan for another W88 nuclear warhead. In the area of space-based nuclear weapons, the United States will develop and produce B61-12 nuclear warheads, which can be mounted on B-2, B-21 bombers and F-15, F-16, F-35 fighters. In terms of land-based nuclear weapons, the new generation of intercontinental ballistic missiles will use retrofitted W78 nuclear warheads. The next step to replace the new BM-Y and BM-Z nuclear warheads of W78 will be costly. BM-Y will cost between $12.7 billion and $18.9 billion, and BM-Z will cost an estimated $14.2 billion to $20.6 billion.

Despite NNSAs claim that the investment needed for nuclear arsenal updating is within the scope of affordability and implementation, Kingston Reeve, a member of the Arms Control Association of the United States, said the plan reflects the fact that NNSA is overburdened with nuclear arsenal updating. The US accountability bureau also expressed concern that NNSAs limited budget would not meet the demand. (Bao Huadong)