Japanese seabed robot: can automatically sail to capture creatures and pick shells on the seabed.

category:Internet
 Japanese seabed robot: can automatically sail to capture creatures and pick shells on the seabed.


The picture comes from the World Wide Web China and the new network, April 24, according to Japanese media reports, in April 24th, the University of Tokyo and the Kyushu Industrial University of Japan, the team announced that the development of a robot can automatically move on the seabed and capture biology. It is reported that the advantage of the robot is that it is convenient to use compared with the remote control equipment that someone is taking and cable. The R & D team hopes to play a role in the seabed environmental survey. It is reported that the robot is a cube with a length of about 1.3 meters and the maximum diving depth is 2000 meters. After being lowered from the support ship on the sea, the robot can navigate automatically according to the preset route. Every few seconds, the robot will shoot the bottom of the sea and pick out the unusual terrain, bump and other images that may exist in the shape of the creature, and send it to the support ship. When the object is specified by the image, the robot will return to the corresponding position and use the device to inhale the creature and capture it. In March, the robot dived into the depth of 80 to 120 meters in Chun River Bay, Japan. Several centimeter long shell shells were successfully collected on the seafloor. The R & D team said, if you can get images from images, you will be able to effectively investigate. Source: China new net editor: Hou Wei Cheng _NT4124 It is reported that the robot is a cube with a length of about 1.3 meters and the maximum diving depth is 2000 meters. After being lowered from the support ship on the sea, the robot can navigate automatically according to the preset route. Every few seconds, the robot will shoot the bottom of the sea and pick out the unusual terrain, bump and other images that may exist in the shape of the creature, and send it to the support ship. When the object is specified by the image, the robot will return to the corresponding position and use the device to inhale the creature and capture it. In March, the robot dived into the depth of 80 to 120 meters in Chun River Bay, Japan. Several centimeter long shell shells were successfully collected on the seafloor. The R & D team said, if you can get images from images, you will be able to effectively investigate.