Sniffing socks, dogs can identify people infected with malaria.

category:Internet click:633
 Sniffing socks, dogs can identify people infected with malaria.


A team from Durham University reported the study at the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Health in New Orleans on October 29, local time.

Our research is still in its early stages, but we do prove that dogs are trained to recognize malaria infections by their scents, with considerable accuracy. Steve Lindsay, Professor of Biological Sciences at Durham University, said (SteveLindsay). This can be a non-invasive screening method at every entry point, just as dogs are now scheduled to detect fruits, vegetables and medicines at airports.

Researchers used nylon socks to collect odor samples from healthy-looking children in the upper reaches of the Northwest Gambia and sent them to the Medical Testing Dog Organization in Milton Keynes, UK. These children also screened for Plasmodium falciparum by means of fingertip blood collection.

Staff of the British Medical Testing Dog Organization trained a Labrador named Sally and a Labrador-Golden-Haired Mixed Dog named Lexie to differentiate the odors of infected and uninfected children.

Eventually, the scientists tested the dogs with 175 sock samples, 30 of which came from children infected with malaria and 145 from healthy children.

Tests showed that dogs could smell out 70% of the malaria infection samples and smell 90% of the malaria free samples.

After the first round of testing was successful, the British team trained a third test dog: a Spangler named Fia.

This high-risk disease caused by parasites threatens nearly half of the worlds population. It can be transmitted to humans through mosquito bites. Children, pregnant women and passengers from malaria-free areas are particularly vulnerable to malaria. According to the World Health Organization, there were 22.12 cases of malaria in 2015, resulting in about 429,000 deaths.

The intensification of prevention and control measures has led to a significant reduction in global malaria mortality, but in recent years there has been a trend of bottlenecks. Sub-Saharan Africa, especially in malaria-stricken areas, accounts for 90 per cent of malaria cases and 92 per cent of deaths worldwide.

Early diagnosis and timely treatment are the key to reduce mortality and control transmission. Tu Youyou, a Chinese pharmacist, discovered artemisinin in 1971, which plays a key role in the standard combination therapy for malaria recommended by the World Health Organization. However, many hosts infected with Plasmodium parasites cannot be easily diagnosed and become mobile sources of infection. Detecting dogs is particularly important in countries and regions where there are few malaria cases, because they can provide rapid, boundary and non-invasive testing. After dog screening, people suspected of infection can then confirm the condition by fingertip blood collection. To investigate peoples acceptance of dog screening, the researchers also brought a fake detection dog into a village in Gambia. Most people are very willing to accept its testing. If the method of smelling malaria is really feasible, scientists will sooner or later develop artificial odor sensors. But before that, malaria detection dogs will become a good helper for customs. Source: surging news editor: Qiao Jun Jing _NBJ11279

Early diagnosis and timely treatment are the key to reduce mortality and control transmission. Tu Youyou, a Chinese pharmacist, discovered artemisinin in 1971, which plays a key role in the standard combination therapy for malaria recommended by the World Health Organization. However, many hosts infected with Plasmodium parasites cannot be easily diagnosed and become mobile sources of infection.

Detecting dogs is particularly important in countries and regions where there are few malaria cases, because they can provide rapid, boundary and non-invasive testing. After dog screening, people suspected of infection can then confirm the condition by fingertip blood collection.

To investigate peoples acceptance of dog screening, the researchers also brought a fake detection dog into a village in Gambia. Most people are very willing to accept its testing.

If the method of smelling malaria is really feasible, scientists will sooner or later develop artificial odor sensors. But before that, malaria detection dogs will become a good helper for customs.