The US Army purchases large amounts of highly destructive ammunition at least 3 cluster munitions.

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 The US Army purchases large amounts of highly destructive ammunition at least 3 cluster munitions.


The cluster ammunition is a weapon for dispersing submunitions or small bombs in the target area, the article said. Members of the United States Congress and arms control organizations have long condemned the indiscriminate harm that such weapons cause to civilians decades after the end of the conflict. A now abandoned policy drafted in 2008 during Robert Gatestenure as U.S. Defense Secretary stipulated that the dud rate of any submunition used after 2018 should be controlled at no more than 1%. By 2017, however, the policy had been adjusted to allow cluster munitions with higher dud rates to be put into use. This allows the us to continue to maintain a large inventory of cluster munitions. Since then, the US Army has intensified its efforts to find renewed cluster munitions.

The picture shows the rockets used by the US Army.

The article points out that at the end of last year, the Trump administration cancelled the Ministry of Defenses policy of restricting the use of cluster munitions by its troops. At a meeting in Arlington, Virginia, on October 26, Deputy Defense Secretary Shahnahan explicitly blamed North Korea for the threat.

The article quotes U.S. military officials as saying that the Pentagon intends to buy a new generation of weapons designed to selectively destroy armored vehicles, if not the right target, can self-destroy or self-defuse fuzes. Theoretically, this makes it less likely to harm civilians than the old ones. But bomb experts say this safety feature is inherently unreliable.

The article argues that the U.S. military has used submunitions in many war zones, many of which have not exploded, and they have been scattered on the ground as de facto landmines, long after the end of the conflict, the danger remains.

At the end of October, a spokesman for the Piccadini arsenal, the U.S. Armys weapons and ammunition research and development base, confirmed that the Army planned to buy 3,100 Swedish-made 155-mm Bournus shells from British Aerospace Systems. The Piccadini plant is also considering a similar type of artillery shell, SMArt 155, a German ammunition sold by General Dynamics, according to a representative of the plant and an army official posted online.

The U.S. Army budget document shows that the Army plans to test a new, lethal cluster weapon called the M999, supplied by Israels Military Industrial Systems Corporation. The shell contains nine submunitions, each of which is about the same size and shape as a can, each with a fuze that can emit radio waves to measure its altitude from the ground and remind the fuze of the time it takes to detonate. The representative of Israel military industrial systems also said that the submunition had self destruction characteristics.

These attributes may be important to the Pentagon, which now faces many accusations because of its high dud rate for many submunitions and its refusal to accede to an international convention signed by more than 100 countries and regions. The Convention prohibits the production, stockpiling and use of weapons that cannot detect and destroy a single target, including nine or more submunitions, without self-destructive devices. The US army refused to disclose the dud rate of such weapons that it is trying to buy. Arms trade analyst Jeff Abramson says the Pentagon should never deploy any new submunitions. Military planners can always imagine situations that justify the use or development of a weapon, no matter how impossible that may be, he said. The international community agrees that indiscriminate weapons such as landmines and cluster munitions should never be used. This article source: Reference News Net editor: Yao Wenguang _NN1682

These attributes may be important to the Pentagon, which now faces many accusations because of its high dud rate for many submunitions and its refusal to accede to an international convention signed by more than 100 countries and regions. The Convention prohibits the production, stockpiling and use of weapons that cannot detect and destroy a single target, including nine or more submunitions, without self-destructive devices. The US army refused to disclose the dud rate of such weapons that it is trying to buy.

Arms trade analyst Jeff Abramson says the Pentagon should never deploy any new submunitions. Military planners can always imagine situations that justify the use or development of a weapon, no matter how impossible that may be, he said. The international community agrees that indiscriminate weapons such as landmines and cluster munitions should never be used.