Why did the helicopter crash?

category:Sports click:443
 Why did the helicopter crash?


Vecchi was on a 10-seat twin-engine Agusta-Westland AW169 helicopter. Video released by the media showed that there seemed to be no problem with the helicopters rise, but when the helicopter was ready to turn, the fuselage began to spin and eventually got out of control. Air expert David lalmont talked about his view of the air crash after watching the video.

Theres nothing unusual in the helicopter lift-off phase, but flying off the court is a difficult job because ideally you need some speed and keep climbing, Limont said. But the pilot had been climbing vertically until he was above the stadium, then began to turn to the right, and soon lost control of the plane. Just after he made a move that seemed ready to turn, the plane was out of control.

Limont believes that the helicopters tail rotor was likely to have malfunctioned, causing an air crash. In the event of such a failure, the only option for pilots is to turn the rotor to neutral at once. Lateral rotor failure causes the aircraft to lose thrust, which will cause you to fall quickly. The pilot needs to get the two rotors back in neutral at a very fast speed, and the power must be switched off fast enough to keep the rotor spinning and allow the helicopter to taxi. Limont pointed out that this emergency response to the premise that the helicopter must have enough altitude, and Vickis helicopter may not fly high enough to cause the pilot to be unable to deal with in time. Once the fuselage begins to spin, it is almost impossible to try to do all this. Source: NetEase sports writer: Fu and then editor in charge: Liu Jia _NBJ10044

Limont believes that the helicopters tail rotor was likely to have malfunctioned, causing an air crash. In the event of such a failure, the only option for pilots is to turn the rotor to neutral at once. Lateral rotor failure causes the aircraft to lose thrust, which will cause you to fall quickly. The pilot needs to get the two rotors back in neutral at a very fast speed, and the power must be switched off fast enough to keep the rotor spinning and allow the helicopter to taxi.

Limont pointed out that this emergency response to the premise that the helicopter must have enough altitude, and Vickis helicopter may not fly high enough to cause the pilot to be unable to deal with in time. Once the fuselage begins to spin, it is almost impossible to try to do all this.