Scientists want to create super accurate 3D maps of human cells: how is it going?

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 Scientists want to create super accurate 3D maps of human cells: how is it going?


NetEase news April 24th news, according to the Smithson Society website reports, most people have heard of the human genome project, this is a cross disciplinary scientific exploration project of the year, and in 2001 the human genome of the fine map and preliminary analysis results. The human cell mapping program (HumanCellAtlas) is also a large-scale international cooperation project. Whats going on at the moment? The human cell map program covers 185 projects, and more than 480 scientists are involved. The ultimate goal is to sequence at least 10 billion cells from all tissues, organs and systems, and to classify about 37 trillion and 200 billion cells in the body. By studying the genetic characteristics of each cell, researchers hope to better understand the working principle of cells. The plan is going well at the moment. The latest data set released by the team covers detailed information on 530 thousand immune system cells. The scientists used these new methods to treat 224 thousand bone marrow cells from four adult patients. This amount is about 100 times that of most cell sequencing experiments so far. The team also sequenced a number of cells from umbilical cord blood. Research team member Daniel Dion (DanielleDionne) said, collecting and handling 500 thousand immune cells is an arduous task and needs to be closely coordinated and co - operated by teams across a wide range of professions. The team previously published two sets of cell map data for 2000 human spleen cells and 6639 mouse lymph node samples. The latest 530 thousand immunocyte data sets are larger on scale, and the team will soon publish a new dataset that has doubled in size - 1 million 80 thousand cells from umbilical cord blood and bone marrow and white blood cells. One collaborator of the study also sequenced 250 thousand other human developmental cells, but no data were published. All in all, these data take a solid first step for the final goal of analyzing 10 billion cells. The teams initial goal was to develop a detailed draft of 30 million to 100 million cells. The human cell map plan will complete three major goals. First, create a super accurate 3D map to show the location of different cell types in the human body. Second, reveal which genes are active in each cell, so that researchers can understand the genetic development and operation of human tissues. Third, the plan is expected to reveal new human bodies. So far, researchers have identified about 300 different types of human cells, including adipocytes and neurons. But in recent years, molecular analysis has helped researchers discover previously neglected types of tissue, including two retinal cells and one immune cell. This immune cell can produce steroids with immunosuppressive effect. The cell mapping program is likely to reveal more new tissue types. Mike Stubenton (MikeStubbington) of the British Sanger Institute said, we will find something in expectation, what we know will exist, but Im sure that something new will be found. I think there will be a surprise. He is the chief collaborator of the plan. The ultimate goal of the program is to accelerate the research process of medical researchers and biologists around the world. They will use this information to study the development of cells, develop highly targeted drugs and treatments, and eventually create a new era of precision medicine. (Chen Chen) the source of this article: NetEase science and technology report editor: Wang Fengzhi _NT2541 So far, researchers have identified about 300 different types of human cells, including adipocytes and neurons. But in recent years, molecular analysis has helped researchers discover previously neglected types of tissue, including two retinal cells and one immune cell. This immune cell can produce steroids with immunosuppressive effect. The cell mapping program is likely to reveal more new tissue types. Mike Stubenton (MikeStubbington) of the British Sanger Institute said, we will find something in expectation, what we know will exist, but Im sure that something new will be found. I think there will be a surprise. He is the chief collaborator of the plan. The ultimate goal of the program is to accelerate the research process of medical researchers and biologists around the world. They will use this information to study the development of cells, develop highly targeted drugs and treatments, and eventually create a new era of precision medicine. (cherishing Chen)