The first interstellar visitor of the solar system, lost, left a mystery to mankind.

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 The first interstellar visitor of the solar system, lost, left a mystery to mankind.


Spitzer Space Telescope (SST), the largest and farthest infrared telescope ever released by humans. Recently, however, it failed to catch Oumuamua, its first interstellar visitor, in a planned orbit. Repeated detection is still missing.

It has been a whole year since the appearance of the Omo, but for humans, it is still a mystery of interstellar, the existence and disappearance of the celestial body is a reminder of the universe between neighbors full of surprises.

Distant messenger

In October 2017, NASA announced that scientists had detected the first interstellar object to visit the solar system. It was first discovered by the halakala Observatory in Hawaii and subsequently confirmed by ESA.

Aomori is red, cigar-shaped, and moves fast --- entering the solar system at a rate of 25.5 kilometers per second and then reaching 44 kilometers per second at one point. Its trajectory is different from that of an asteroid or a comet in the ordinary solar system, which travels in a hyperbolic orbit and is not bound by the solar system, meaning that it comes from outside the solar system. The International Astronomical Society named it 1I/2017? U1. But ESA has taken another Hawaii name for it: Austria street, meaning distant messenger.

Astronomers are frustrated by the fact that the speed and brightness of the motion are difficult to capture by existing technology, and only a rough spectrum can be obtained without detailed information on the reflectivity of the object, so its physical properties are at a loss.

Astronomers suspect that its color may mean that there is no volatile matter on its surface. But there is no knowledge of its internal composition.

Step by step

Before the Austrian motherland, humans had never been able to study anything close to the solar system. After the appearance of the Austrian motherland, people still did not know what it was.

Because even if were lucky enough to encounter it, we dont have the strength to figure out where it comes from, and we may lose it forever before our technology catches up.

The Spitzer Space Telescope is currently about 250 million kilometers away from us, orbiting the sun, which is close to the path of Omo, and its bands can be controlled from far infrared, mid-infrared to near infrared, but after a 30-hour search, Omo can not be found.

Scientists at the Spitzer telescope team explained simply that it was too far away for any human telescope to detect.

According to the calculation, Omo should be between Jupiter and Saturn, four years later will cross the orbit of Neptune, through the solar system never return.

A beginning

For astronomers, the Austrian street is a rare scientific resource.

Over the course of the year, a large-scale investigation was launched into it, and existing technical analysis suggests that its surface may be closer to small objects in the solar system. Astronomers believe it should have a layer and a half meters thick containing organic matter, based on an Austrian model of the nature of strangers. This result is very helpful for people to understand the celestial bodies near the solar system.

Besides its structure, its trajectory is also fascinating. This summer, a team from ESAs SSA-NEO Coordination Center analyzed observations of the movement of the motherland on the ground and in space, and found that the trajectory of the motherland could not even be explained by the gravitational pull of the sun, planets and large asteroids alone.

In other words, the momentum of Austrias accelerated departure from the solar system is essentially non-gravitational and may be in line with comet behavior, driven by its own gas release. But this conclusion is not convincing to all. Now, the departure of the unfamiliar street has made many studies lose the chance to be verified. However, more astronomers believe that there should be plenty of interstellar visitors and will visit the solar system from time to time. They even planned to launch spacecraft as they approached Earth, meet them in narrow paths and shoot, then analyze the splashed debris. This is just the beginning of the study of similar objects in the Ormo. Just as the first Kuiper Belt object, 1992? QB1, was discovered in the early 1990s, so far a large number of Kuiper Belt objects have been discovered, which enrich our interstellar archives with the advances in detection and analysis techniques. Source: ScienceDaily daily Author: Zhang Mengran editor in charge: Shi Jianlei _NBJ11331

Now, the departure of the unfamiliar street has made many studies lose the chance to be verified. However, more astronomers believe that there should be plenty of interstellar visitors and will visit the solar system from time to time. They even planned to launch spacecraft as they approached Earth, meet them in narrow paths and shoot, then analyze the splashed debris.

This is just the beginning of the study of similar objects in the Ormo. Just as the first Kuiper Belt object, 1992? QB1, was discovered in the early 1990s, so far a large number of Kuiper Belt objects have been discovered, which enrich our interstellar archives with the advances in detection and analysis techniques.