US military challenge: to reduce the launch process from a few years to a few days.

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 US military challenge: to reduce the launch process from a few years to a few days.


NetEase news April 23rd, according to Engadget, even in the growing rise of private Aerospace Corp, the process of sending rockets into space is also very slow: these companies may need months or years to arrange and prepare a task. This has become a norm in any rocket launch mission, but DARPA, a secret development agency under the US Department of defense, believes that the industry can do better. DARPA recently launched the LaunchChallenge challenge, encouraging companies to shorten the launch schedule to a few days, not a few years. Teams need to develop systems that can launch two low earth orbit rockets in a few days and at different locations and do not receive advance notification. They learned the first launch site several weeks before launching and understood the payload several days before launch. The challenge will be held at the end of 2019, and DARPA offers the top prize of $10 million for the champion ($9 million and $8 million for the Asian and quarterly), and a $2 million award for each team completing the first launch, which will greatly accelerate the pace of rocket launch. The criteria for judging the winning team are not only the launch schedule, but also the accuracy of launch, the nature of payload and the quality of the rocket. The challenge is particularly useful for the US military, so that they can launch spies and communications satellites using the fast turnaround time when needed. However, the results of the challenge may also help to launch various rocket launches in the future. For space tourism, the current system is completely unrealistic, and it is necessary to achieve frequent launches in this field, which can help improve the economies of scale and make space travel cheaper. (small) source of this article: NetEase science and technology report editor: Wang Fengzhi _NT2541 The challenge will be held at the end of 2019, and DARPA offers the top prize of $10 million for the champion ($9 million and $8 million for the Asian and quarterly), and a $2 million award for each team completing the first launch, which will greatly accelerate the pace of rocket launch. The criteria for judging the winning team are not only the launch schedule, but also the accuracy of launch, the nature of payload and the quality of the rocket. The challenge is particularly useful for the US military, so that they can launch spies and communications satellites using the fast turnaround time when needed.