32 pangolin death, green will raise public interest litigation, Guangxi forestry department as defendant

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 32 pangolin death, green will raise public interest litigation, Guangxi forestry department as defendant


Origin: 32 rescued pangolin bodies, all died after more than two months.

On August 17, 2017, the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region Forestry Department (hereinafter referred to as the Guangxi Forestry Department) received a report from the Guangxi Qinzhou Forestry Bureau that the third detachment of the Guangxi Maritime Police was to hand over to the Guangxi Forestry Department a number of pangolins that had been smuggled into China. The Guangxi wildlife rescue center affiliated to Guangxi forestry department was sent to receive it.

After on-site counting, Guangxi Wildlife Rescue Center confirmed that 34 pangolins were rescued, including 32 living and 2 dead. In the early morning of August 18, 2017, Guangxi Wildlife Rescue Center took the pangolins back to the base rescue and quarantine site for treatment.

After the rescued pangolins were taken back to the base of Guangxi Wildlife Rescue Center, 10 pangolins were confirmed as no significant trauma by the entrance examination. The other 8 pangolins were labeled as emaciated, no significant trauma by Guangxi Wildlife Rescue Center.

According to the Guangxi Forestry Department, up to August 29, 2017, the pangolins were in a state of survival until August 30, 2017, two pangolins began to die; by October 22, 2017, the 32 pangolins rescued were all dead. In terms of survival time, the shortest survived 13 days and the longest survived 66 days in the base of Guangxi Wildlife Rescue Center.

Green believes that the Guangxi wildlife rescue center violates laws and regulations, and malpractices in ambulance.

According to the investigation by the Green Society, the causes of death of these pangolins (32 living pangolins) were ascites (bacterial infection death due to stress), internal hemorrhage, pneumonia, intestinal bleeding, enteritis, hepatitis and so on. None of the 32 pangolins died of high pathogenic virus infection and no animal infectious disease or epidemic disease was found.

In addition, the Guangxi Forestry Department has promised: at the end of the quarantine period and after the quarantine qualified, under the guidance of the State Forestry Bureau suitable for release to the wild in China. The Guangxi Forestry Department and its wildlife rescue center failed to follow suit, even when environmental protection organizations offered to help wildlife release. By September 17th, 8 of the rescued pangolin survived. Results until late October, all 32 live pangolin rescued were killed.

As the Guangxi Forestry Department, which is in charge of the protection of terrestrial wildlife, the management of quarantine sites for imported animals and has the right to approve the release of wild animals of abnormal origin, refused the assistance of environmental protection organizations during the rescue of these pangolins and neglected to exercise its supervisory duties, allowing 32 pangolins to die. Only after all the pangolins died, the pangolins were evidently at fault for their high pathogenic viruses and alien species.

The population of pangolin in China has been reduced by half in 10 years.

Pangolin, the largest mammal in the global illegal trade, has been highly protected in the world for decades.

Since 1995, all pangolin species have been listed in Appendix II to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), and international trade in pangolin and its products has been strictly controlled. The following year, the World Conservation Union (IUCN) put all pangolin species on the Red List of Endangered Species. Before 2007, pangolins distributed in China were listed as the national class II key protected wildlife, and were classified as vulnerable class (VU) by the Red Book on Endangered Animals in China (Mammals).

In 2007, the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and the Conservation International Foundation (CI) were assessed to change Chinese and Malay pangolins from low-risk (LR) to endangered (EN). In 2014, the World Conservation Unions Red List of Endangered Species upgraded the Malay and Chinese pangolins from Endangered (EN) to Extremely Endangered (CR). In October 2016, at the 17th CITES Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, the States Parties adopted a resolution to upgrade all eight species of pangolins from Appendix I I to Appendix I. Since January 2017, international trade of pangolins has been completely banned, and international trade has been regulated by quotas, which shows that the international trade of pangolins has been completely banned. Society attaches importance to the protection of pangolin.

Chinese pangolin was once widely distributed in the southern provinces of China. Historically, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Yunnan, Guizhou, Hainan, Hunan and Taiwan were the most common. However, in 2008, the related research institutes found that the population of pangolin in Guangdong, Hunan and other provinces declined very fast, and few entities were found in the field; however, the wild populations in Hainan, Henan and Jiangsu provinces have been very difficult to see entities.

In fact, the resource reserves of pangolin in China began to decline in the early 1980s. A survey of key terrestrial wildlife resources carried out by the State Forestry Administration around 1998 found that there were about 64,000 pangolin wild populations in China. By 2008, the number of pangolin wild in China had dropped to 251-494,500, that is, 2,500 pangolin China. In the 10 years, the population decreased by about 1/2. The number of wild pangolin is likely to be lower according to the rate of decline in the previous population. Similarly, the number of eight species of pangolin, which belong to the worlds most endangered animals, has declined in varying degrees, especially the Chinese pangolin, Indian pangolin and Malay pangolin.

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