Little known big winners of the epidemic: robots and automation

category:Finance
 Little known big winners of the epidemic: robots and automation


Logistics robots now have the largest market share, and their number is expected to double between 2019 and 2021. The number of robots of all types will increase, especially medical and cleaning robots.

According to braincorp, the number of cleaning robots in U.S. retail locations increased by 13.8% year-on-year in the first quarter and 24.0% in the second quarter. Currently, robots can clean floors, windows and pipes, and even kill bacteria in hospitals.

A recent McKinsey survey of 800 executives around the world shows that trends in automation and digitization are accelerating the disruption of our work scene.

According to the survey, since the outbreak of the Xinguan epidemic, 67% of the companies have accelerated the application of automation and artificial intelligence; in 85% of the companies, the communication and cooperation between employees have become more digital; in 48% of the companies, the customer-oriented channels have become more digital; and 36% of the companies have accelerated the digital management of the supply chain. According to McKinsey, executives have shifted their use of automation from cost reduction to competitive advantage. Robotics has taken on a more onerous task during the epidemic, Elisabeth Reynolds, executive director of MITs future working group, told the Financial Times: we can speculate that some companies have learned how to maintain productivity with fewer workers. Patrick schwarzkop, director of IFR, told the financial times that the epidemic has gradually made the idea of a digital factory a reality. Some smart factories have applied augmented reality (AR), hybrid reality (MR) and remote digital services, so new machines can be installed and operated automatically, while workers only need to supervise and maintain at home. Source: Wall Street news editor in charge: Zhong Qiming_ NF5619

Robotics has taken on a more onerous task during the epidemic, Elisabeth Reynolds, executive director of MITs future working group, told the Financial Times: we can speculate that some companies have learned how to maintain productivity with fewer workers.

Patrick schwarzkop, director of IFR, told the financial times that the epidemic has gradually made the idea of a digital factory a reality. Some smart factories have applied augmented reality (AR), hybrid reality (MR) and remote digital services, so new machines can be installed and operated automatically, while workers only need to supervise and maintain at home.