South Korea plans to launch a new launch vehicle in October, after Lo Lao 3 hit 2.

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 South Korea plans to launch a new launch vehicle in October, after Lo Lao 3 hit 2.


The Korean Academy of Aeronautics and Astronautics launched a simulated KSLV-2 rocket into the launching pad on Aug. 14 at the Yonhap Wailao Space Launch Center in Quannan, South Korea, Chinas Central Daily reported on Aug. 16. Simulated test rocket is the same size as the actual launch rocket, but it can not be launched, only for testing and inspection. It is reported that the trial arrow will undergo a one month test.

KSLV-2 rocket capacity has been greatly improved compared with the previous launch of the Lo Lo rocket.

KSLV-2 is the first three-stage launch vehicle developed by South Korea, using a 75-ton rocket engine developed by the ROK. It is different from the two stage rocket KSLV-1. Three stage Rockets need more sophisticated technology when separating. The KSLV-2 rocket is 46.5 meters long and weighs 200 tons, longer and heavier than the Ronald (33 meters long and 142 tons). The thrust of the first class rocket will reach 300 tons, much larger than the Luo Lao.

The KSLV-2 rocket has a maximum carrying capacity of 1.5 tons, far exceeding the Luolao rockets carrying capacity of more than 100 kilograms. If the launch is successful, South Koreas future small satellites can be launched by its own rocket, to some extent, out of dependence on foreign rockets.

According to the plan, the Korean launch vehicle will adopt the three-step mode, and gradually develop a practical rocket. The first phase will focus on the development of 5-10 ton liquid engines and test facilities, which will be completed by 2014. The second stage developed a 75 ton thrust liquid rocket, which is the main engine of the KSLV-2 rocket. The third stage is to bundle four 75-ton thrust basic engines to form a 300-ton practical launch vehicle.

Previously, the rocket Launched three times in 2009, 2010 and 2013 respectively, but the first two failed, the third successful launch, South Korea became the worlds eleventh country to use self-launched rockets to send satellites into space.

Although the success of the launch of the Roro is of historic significance to South Korea, the Roro was criticized by South Korean media as a semi-Korean rocket because its first-class rocket was made in Russia. The KSLV-2 rocket has developed its own engine and is expected to become a real South Korean rocket.

South Korea is moving toward the goal of realizing the dream of a cosmic power. It is not only actively promoting its own rocket development program, but also putting forward corresponding plans on satellites and lunar probes.

Central Daily reported in August last year that the Korean Defense Agency has decided to promote the 425 project the basic strategy and system development plan. Project 425 means to ensure that South Korea has five autonomous reconnaissance satellites, including four synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites and one optical reconnaissance satellite. Radar satellites can also be reconnaissance under poor weather conditions. In terms of lunar exploration, the Korean Academy of Aeronautics and Astronautics revealed in December last year that it would launch a lunar probe through the Falcon 9 rocket of SpaceX to achieve the goal of lunar exploration. The South Korean lunar probe weighs 550 kilograms and carries five equipments independently developed by South Korea, such as high-definition cameras and lunar gamma-ray spectrometers. The source of this article: surging news editor: Wang Zheng _NN7526

Central Daily reported in August last year that the Korean Defense Agency has decided to promote the 425 project the basic strategy and system development plan. Project 425 means to ensure that South Korea has five autonomous reconnaissance satellites, including four synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellites and one optical reconnaissance satellite. Radar satellites can also be reconnaissance under poor weather conditions.

In terms of lunar exploration, the Korean Academy of Aeronautics and Astronautics revealed in December last year that it would launch a lunar probe through the Falcon 9 rocket of SpaceX to achieve the goal of lunar exploration. The South Korean lunar probe weighs 550 kilograms and carries five equipments independently developed by South Korea, such as high-definition cameras and lunar gamma-ray spectrometers.