SpaceX and others beat blue origin and won billions of US Air Force orders

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 SpaceX and others beat blue origin and won billions of US Air Force orders


Photo: NASAs commercial manned aviation program (CPP) launched successfully on May 30, local time.

According to reports, ula won 60% of the contract and SpaceX won the remaining 40%. Both sides will be responsible for national security tasks for a total of five years from 2022 to 2026. The military previously said it expected to spend about $1 billion a year on rocket launches.

The contract, which includes more than 30 launches, is the second phase of the national security space launch mission. The air force space and missile systems center in Los Angeles is responsible for the contract. SpaceX, ula, Northrop Grumman and blue origin are bidding.

Ula, a joint venture between Boeing and Lockheed Martin, and SpaceX have been responsible for launching national security missions. In this decade, dozens of equipment have been launched for the military. National security missions are the most profitable in the rocket business, with each launch worth more than $100 million. The U.S. military has signed more than $12 billion worth of launch contracts with ula and SpaceX between 2012 and 2019.

According to the report, two years ago, the air force signed development contracts with ula, Northrop Grumman and blue origin with a value of $967 million, 792 million and $500 million respectively. At that time, there was a lot of controversy. SpaceX, which had not won the contract, sued the military, while blue origin protested against the standards in the DOD launch contract.

Blue origin did not get the contract, but it is likely to continue to manufacture the new Glenn rocket. The new Glenn reusable design, similar to the SpaceX rocket landing, returns the booster after each mission.

Previously, blue origins CEO said in 2019 that the company would continue to develop the new Glenn rocket, whether or not it won the launch contract for the national security space launch mission.

Source: Wang Fengzhi, editor in charge of China News Network_ NT2541