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More than one fault! NASA unveils details of the test flight of Boeings Starline spacecraft

category:Internet
 More than one fault! NASA unveils details of the test flight of Boeings Starline spacecraft


On December 20 last year, Boeings first test flight of the Starline manned spacecraft did not go as planned. A software failure during the launch process made the spacecraft unable to start the main engine at the right time, resulting in the spacecraft entering the wrong orbit. In the end, the manned spacecraft failed to reach the international space station, and the landing time was much earlier than expected. At a public meeting of NASAs aviation safety advisory group, it now appears that Boeing found a second software failure as the spacecraft entered orbit. Although the details are not clear, this glitch may cause the spacecraft to unnecessarily fire its thrusters when landing on earth, which may cause the spacecraft to lose control.

NASA and Boeing revealed the first software issue during the launch, but remained silent on the second until today. Both agencies are investigating the reasons behind these software problems, but members of the security advisory group are concerned about Boeings test procedures, and they hope NASA will study the companys protocol process for the management and processing of the Starline manned spacecraft. The panel is more concerned about the rigor of Boeings review process, Paul Hill, a member of the panel, said at the meeting At the same time, NASA is still trying to determine whether Boeing is needed to repeat the unmanned test flight of the spacecraft due to its failure to reach the international space station, a decision to be made in the coming weeks. (Chen Chen) source: Qiao JunJing, editor in charge of Netease Technology Report

NASA and Boeing revealed the first software issue during the launch, but remained silent on the second until today. Both agencies are investigating the reasons behind these software problems, but members of the security advisory group are concerned about Boeings test procedures, and they hope NASA will study the companys protocol process for the management and processing of the Starline manned spacecraft. The panel is more concerned about the rigor of Boeings review process, Paul Hill, a member of the panel, said at the meeting

At the same time, NASA is still trying to determine whether Boeing is needed to repeat the unmanned test flight of the spacecraft due to its failure to reach the international space station, a decision to be made in the coming weeks. (Chen Chen)