Saturn is the new King of Satellites in the solar system: the total number of satellites reaches 82

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 Saturn is the new King of Satellites in the solar system: the total number of satellites reaches 82


Saturn Visual Chinese Data Map

Xinhua News Agency, Beijing, Oct. 12 (Xinhua) - The International Astronomical Federations Asteroid Center recently announced that researchers have discovered 20 new satellites around Saturn, bringing the total number of Saturns discovered satellites to 82, surpassing Jupiter, which has 79 satellites, to become the new king of satellites in the solar system.

With the help of the Japanese Pleiades telescope, which was built in Hawaii, USA, a team led by researchers from the Carnegie Society of Sciences found the 20 new members of the Saturn family. The research team has launched an online nomination campaign for the new satellite, which is expected to be named after images in Nordic, Gaul or Inuit myths, until December 6 this year.

Each of the 20 newly discovered Saturn satellites is only about 5 kilometers in diameter, of which 17 are retrograde satellites, that is, they orbit Saturn in the opposite direction to Saturns rotation; the other three are anterograde satellites.

They all belong to outer satellites farther away from Saturn, one of which is a retrograde satellite which is the farthest known satellite from Saturn. Saturns outer satellites are divided into Nordic, Gaul and Inuit groups according to their orbital inclination. Among the newly discovered satellites, two anterograde satellites are classified as the Inuit Group. Researchers believe that the two satellites, like other members of the group, were formed by the splitting of a David star in the distant past. Seventeen retrograde satellites were assigned to the Nordic Group, and they may have belonged to a larger satellite. Another anterograde satellite has an orbital inclination similar to that of the Gaul Group satellites, but its orbital radius is much larger than that of other anterograde satellites, including members of the Gaul Group. Studying the orbits of these satellites can reveal their origins and information about the environment around Saturn when it formed. Scientist Scott Shepard of the Carnegie Society of Sciences said that similar clusters of outer satellites could also be seen around Jupiter, suggesting intense collisions between Saturns satellites or between satellites and passing asteroids, comets and other external objects. The newly discovered satellite can continue to orbit Saturn after its mother satellite has split, which means that such collisions occur after the formation of the planet. Source: responsible editor of Xinhua News Agency: Wang Fengzhi_NT2541

They all belong to outer satellites farther away from Saturn, one of which is a retrograde satellite which is the farthest known satellite from Saturn. Saturns outer satellites are divided into Nordic, Gaul and Inuit groups according to their orbital inclination. Among the newly discovered satellites, two anterograde satellites are classified as the Inuit Group. Researchers believe that the two satellites, like other members of the group, were formed by the splitting of a David star in the distant past. Seventeen retrograde satellites were assigned to the Nordic Group, and they may have belonged to a larger satellite. Another satellite has an orbit angle similar to that of Gaul group, but its orbit radius is much larger than that of other satellites including Gaul group members.

Studying the orbits of these satellites can reveal their origins and information about the environment around Saturn when it formed. Scientist Scott Shepard of the Carnegie Society of Sciences said that similar clusters of outer satellites could also be seen around Jupiter, suggesting intense collisions between Saturns satellites or between satellites and passing asteroids, comets and other external objects. The newly discovered satellite can continue to orbit Saturn after its mother satellite has split, which means that such collisions occur after the formation of the planet.