AI art is flourishing day by day. Where is the future?

category:Internet
 AI art is flourishing day by day. Where is the future?


[Netease Intelligent News, Oct. 12] Paintings created by artificial intelligence have attracted more and more attention in recent years, and some works can even be sold at high prices at well-known auction houses. But there are still many questions to be answered, such as whether its author is a programmer who developed algorithms or a computer? Where will the market of AI Art go in the future?

Is this art?

Is this art? Michael Tyka, a Google software engineer and artist, asked the audience at the Christies Art + Technology Summit in New York in June. The theme of this event is Artificial Intelligence Revolution, and the question of Tika is about the works of art created by using Artificial Intelligence.

Of course, that question is a counter-question. He flashed an image of a urinal onto two large screens on both sides of the stage - Marcel Duchamps famous and controversial sculpture fountain. The audience laughed. Obviously, it can be counted as a work of art. He said.

Apart from that, the summit barely discussed the artistic value of AI art, although it attracted people from the fields of science, technology, art and collections. Instead, the focus is on the extent to which this new form of art will subvert the industry.

The occasion for discussion was very appropriate: In October 2018, Christies New York auction house sold an algorithmically generated European portrait, Edmond de Belamy, for an astonishing $432,500, for almost 45 times its highest estimate. The print, created by the French art organization oblvious, has never been on display or sold before the auction, which shocked the whole art world.

However, amid all kinds of controversy, many people in the art world are still trying to explore several outstanding issues. For example, who is an artist, a programmer or a computer, for an algorithmic work of art? Because many AI works of art are digital, how to evaluate a work that is designed to be native to the Internet and widely shared? So where will the market for this new type of work go? At present, there is no clear answer.

Attracted much attention

Famous art institutions and collections around the world are paying attention to this new art. Marisa Kayyem, director of the continuing education program at Christies College of Education, said: If we look at whats happening in the art world from a larger perspective, not just in the sales field, we will find that whats happening has tremendous driving force and strong support from institutions. Collectors are becoming accustomed to AI art.

Many people in the field of art have turned a blind eye to the term AI art, believing that it is misleading and too referential. Like other programmers and artists, Kringman prefers the word generative art. The term covers all works created using algorithms. Kringmans works were auctioned by Sothebys. The origin of Generative Art can be traced back to the late 1950s.

Jason Bailey, founder of Artnome, a digital art blog, said AI art is actually a word that the media has put forward in the past three to five years. In his view, the word can be mistaken for robotic creative art. Most artists Ive met dont like being called AI artists. But whether people like it or not, it has been used to refer to the current work done.

Although Edmond de Belamy is the most famous work of AI art, it is somewhat distracting for those who want to understand the medium. The portrait was created using the Generative Countermeasure Network (GANs). GANs use a set of art image samples to infer patterns, then use these knowledge to copy what they have seen, cross-reference the original image, and finally create a new image stream.

The sale of Edmond de Belamy also provoked controversy: Obvious was clearly not the originator of the work algorithm, which was borrowed by Obvious from a young American programmer and artist named Robbie Barrat, but Barrat did not receive a penny from the auction. Obvious only needs to select the image, print it out, put it in a picture frame, and sign it with Barratts algorithm.

In other words, edmonddebelamy is sold as a work of art, although the number of images that AI can produce is endless. However, many AI works of art (if not most) are not produced as a single object. They are videos, animations, and all the numbers and algorithms between them - works designed to exist online and be shared.

This poses a tricky question: how do you evaluate an art that is not scarce in an industry that has always been scarce and determines value?

Will the boom subside?

Great changes are coming, and the industry is going to undergo structural changes. Kelani Nichole, founder of Transfergallery Gallery in Los Angeles, said, I think its a question of value, and I think were going to get rid of the scarce markets that are purely financial instruments.

For the ownership problem of works, a potential answer may be blockchain. This technology can be used to create tokens that represent the authenticity of digital works. But Nicole says the issue may not matter to a new generation of young investors who have different views on art and collections. She pointed out that people who grew up and became rich in the digital age had different views on material scarcity, transparency and ownership. The experience of a work of art may be more important than the physical. Their lifestyle is like a digital nomad. They own things differently. This is a new generation of values, and it has nothing to do with material scarcity.

Claire Marmion, founder and CEO of Haven Art Group, a New York art collection management company, said collectors were still trying to figure out where the AI art market was going and that it might not be as disruptive as some thought. Or at least the industry will adapt to this kind of work.

Artists bring new things and change the status quo, which has a long tradition in the art world. In terms of AI art valuation, there is only a small amount of data. I dont know the accuracy of the current valuation. People are very speculative. Collectors are interested in AI art, but Im not sure if there are many collectors who accept it. Klingelman believes that the current AI art boom will eventually fade, but AI art will not disappear. Instead, he believes that one day it will be seen as another tool for artists. Just as photography has never disappeared, or filmmaking has never disappeared, I am very sure that AI art will become a new media form. Of course, artificial intelligence is still mysterious, but I hope that it will really become a common thing, and people will become concerned about what artists express with their art, klingerman said. (Lebang) Source of this article: Netease Intelligent Responsible Editor: Gu Yuxin_NBJS8596

Artists bring new things and change the status quo, which has a long tradition in the art world. Theres only a small amount of data in terms of the valuation of AI art, says Mamian. I dont know the accuracy of the current valuation. People are very speculative. Collectors are interested in AI art, but Im not sure if many collectors accept it.

Klingelman believes that the current AI art boom will eventually fade, but AI art will not disappear. Instead, he believes that one day it will be seen as another tool for artists.

Just as photography never disappears, or film shooting never disappears, I am very sure that AI art will become a new form of media. Of course, AI is still mysterious now, but I hope it will really become a common thing and people will become concerned about what artists express with their art, Kringman said. (ROBOM)