Vitamin D boosts the skeleton of runners, but dont overdo it.

category:Sports
 Vitamin D boosts the skeleton of runners, but dont overdo it.


According to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, vitamin D intake exceeding the recommended standard of up to 600 international units (IU) per day may lead to a reduction in bone mineral density. 303 subjects (55-70 years old) received vitamin D supplements once a day for up to three years, with three criteria, 400, 4000 or 10,000 IU. Their wrist and ankle bone strength and bone mineral density were measured at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months respectively, and their vitamin D and calcium content were measured at 3, 6, 18, 24, 30 and 36 months respectively.

Three years later, the BMD of people who took 400 IU of vitamin D per day decreased by 1.4%, those who took 4000IU of vitamin D per day decreased by 2.6%, and those who took 10 000 IU of vitamin D per day decreased by 3.6%. From this data, it can be seen that the more vitamin D intake, the more serious the decline in bone mineral density. Stephen Boyd, a researcher at the University of Calgary in Canada and one of the authors of the study, said that excessive vitamin D was associated with increased levels of a blood marker for bone decomposition and inhibited parathyroid hormone secretion. Parathyroid hormone keeps blood calcium at normal levels, and calcium is a bone-strengthening mineral. In addition, parathyroid hormone also stimulates normal bone maintenance, that is, removing old bone and stimulating new bone growth. So the ultimate result of vitamin D overdose is a decrease in bone mineral density. Boyd advises runners that regular sunshine, normal diet and exercise can ensure adequate vitamin D content, so there is no need to increase vitamin D content through supplements. Source: Netease Sports Author: Changbao Responsible Editor: Yang Shuo_NS4396

Three years later, the BMD of people who took 400 IU of vitamin D per day decreased by 1.4%, those who took 4000IU of vitamin D per day decreased by 2.6%, and those who took 10 000 IU of vitamin D per day decreased by 3.6%. From this data, it can be seen that the more vitamin D intake, the more serious the decline in bone mineral density.

Stephen Boyd, a researcher at the University of Calgary in Canada and one of the authors of the study, said that excessive vitamin D was associated with increased levels of a blood marker for bone decomposition and inhibited parathyroid hormone secretion. Parathyroid hormone keeps blood calcium at normal levels, and calcium is a bone-strengthening mineral. In addition, parathyroid hormone also stimulates normal bone maintenance, that is, removing old bone and stimulating new bone growth. So the ultimate result of vitamin D overdose is a decrease in bone mineral density.

Boyd advises runners that regular sunshine, normal diet and exercise can ensure adequate vitamin D content, so there is no need to increase vitamin D content through supplements.