Is it warming that causes stupidity? Climate change affects brain development in 96percent of the population

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 Is it warming that causes stupidity? Climate change affects brain development in 96percent of the population


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Journalist Zhang Mengrun

Do you think your brain is a bit awkward? Now, give you an excuse that nobody can refute.

Scientists say that if global warming continues to intensify, by 2100, 96% of the worlds population may not be able to absorb enough omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for brain development.

This means that most people will become dumb because of global warming.

Human beings cannot synthesize DHA by themselves

Docosahexaenoic acid, a kind of DHA, omega-3 fatty acid. This is the most abundant fatty acid in mammalian brain. It plays an important role in physiological processes such as neuroprotection, cell survival and inflammation. In human cerebral cortex, its content is up to 20%.

At present, people attach great importance to the supplement of DHA. According to scientific opinions, the development of human brain in the early stage requires not only DHA, but also balanced intake of eight major nutrients - protein, taurine, fatty acid, iron, zinc, iodine, selenium and B vitamins.

However, the particularity of DHA is that although this fatty acid is essential for nerve development and health, humans cannot synthesize enough of it by themselves and need to be satisfied by ingesting fish or nutritional supplements.

DHA usage is facing a decline

Stephanie Colombo, a scientist at Dellhouse University in Canada, Tim Rogers of the University of Toronto and their colleagues from the University of Rielson and the University of Toronto developed a mathematical model to investigate the decline in DHA usage under different global warming scenarios.

In the aquatic food chain, DHA is mainly produced by algae, and the biochemical reaction process of DHA is sensitive to small changes in temperature.

Researchers have found that if global warming continues to intensify, the decline in DHA production and population growth may result in 96% of the worlds population not getting enough DHA from domestic fish.

Residents of countries and regions with large fish production and relatively small populations (such as Greenland, Norway, Chile and New Zealand) may still be able to consume the recommended daily dose of DHA (100mg). By contrast, by 2100, East and Southeast Asian countries (such as China, Japan and Indonesia) and most African countries will have surplus DHA intake and will not reach the recommended minimum.

Colombo and Rogers concluded: According to our model, global warming will lead to a 10-58% reduction in global DHA usage over the next 80 years.

Human embryonic and infancy are most affected.

Researchers say that the most affected by the decline in DHA production is the developmental stages of vulnerable groups and humans, such as embryonic and infantile stages, and carnivorous mammals, especially those in the polar regions, may also be affected. To predict annual DHA production in every United Nations fishing area around the world, the team used the database of the Oceans around us project, which provides reconstructed fisheries data to help assess the impact of fishing on marine ecosystems. The warming scenario is forecasted using the global warming scenario outlined in the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. At the same time, the team reported another interesting finding: the decline in DHA production in freshwater fishing areas was more pronounced than that in seawater fishing areas. The reason for this phenomenon should be that the predicted temperature rise in freshwater waters was greater than that in oceans. Therefore, the decline in DHA availability may have a greater impact on some regions, especially in the African interior. Source of this article: responsible editor of Science and Technology Daily: Wang Fengzhi_NT2541

Researchers say that the most affected by the decline in DHA production is the developmental stages of vulnerable groups and humans, such as embryonic and infantile stages, and carnivorous mammals, especially those in the polar regions, may also be affected.

To predict annual DHA production in every United Nations fishing area around the world, the team used the database of the Oceans around us project, which provides reconstructed fisheries data to help assess the impact of fishing on marine ecosystems. The warming scenario is forecasted using the global warming scenario outlined in the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

At the same time, the team reported another interesting finding: the decline in DHA production in freshwater fishing areas was more pronounced than that in seawater fishing areas. The reason for this phenomenon should be that the predicted temperature rise in freshwater waters was greater than that in oceans. Therefore, the decline in DHA availability may have a greater impact on some regions, especially in the African interior.