U.S. Army Buying the Pentagon of Xinjiang UAV in Ignorance of Security Questions: Special Exemption

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 U.S. Army Buying the Pentagon of Xinjiang UAV in Ignorance of Security Questions: Special Exemption


Last May, the U.S. Department of Defense banned the military from buying and using Chinese UAVs on the grounds of potential network security risks. However, in the year following the ban, the US Navy and Air Force spent nearly $190,000 and $50,000 on Xinjiang-made UAVs in August and November last year, respectively.

And according to a document received by US media on September 16, the Pentagon approved the purchase of a Xinjiang UAV until June 28 this year, claiming to be used for training operations. In these cases, both the Air Force and the Navy used a special exemption approved by the Pentagons Procurement and Maintenance Office, case handling for emergency needs, explained Pentagon spokesman Mike Andrews.

U.S. Soldiers Manipulating Mavicpro in Xinjiang

As early as 2017, the US Army issued a high-profile ban on the use of unmanned aerial vehicles and related products manufactured by Chinas Dajiang Innovation (DJI) under the name of hidden dangers of network security. By May 2018, the U.S. Department of Defense signed a memorandum for the same reason, prohibiting the purchase and use of Chinese-made UAVs.

However, after the ban came into effect, US media reported that according to purchase orders completed in August and November 2018, the US Navy and Air Force spent nearly $190,000 and nearly $50,000 respectively to purchase drones manufactured in Xinjiang. The US Air Force has purchased 35 platinum MavicPro UAVs, while the Navy has purchased an unknown number of Inspire UAVs.

According to US media reports, the purchased UAVs appear to have been used in sensitive and confidential military operations, including the Air Forces only special tactical wing and the Navy, Army and Air Commandos commonly known as SEAL.

According to a document received by US media on September 16, the Pentagon approved the purchase of a Xinjiang UAV until June 28 this year, claiming to be used for training operations.

In addition, US media said it had received a copy of the text explaining the reasons for purchasing Xinjiang UAV components, which confirmed that eight Air Force Special Operations Squadrons were already using 15 Chinese-made UAVs. The document also states that if the system is abandoned, (tactical), software and optical system development will be negatively affected.

In an interview, Pentagon spokesman Mike Andrews explained that in these cases, both the Air Force and the Navy used the special exemption approved by the Pentagon Procurement and Maintenance Office, case handling for emergency needs.

The report also said that the United States would be concerned about the Pentagons continued use of Chinese-made UAVs. The U.S. Senate Military Commission has added a clause to the Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal 2020 to prohibit the use of Chinese UAVs. In the coming weeks, Congress will debate the bill. Meanwhile, in an attempt to replace Chinese products, the Pentagon is trying to recruit investors to produce small U.S. -made UAVs.

In response to various so-called security queries from the United States, Xinjiang has responded in May this year that it has always attached great importance to information security issues, and the security of our technology has been repeatedly validated globally, including the independent validation of the U.S. government and leading U.S. enterprises.

Dajiang said that when users use the UAV or other technology products in Dajiang, the data produced, stored and transmitted are completely mastered by users.

According to the Times, Xinjiang now dominates the global UAV market with 72% market share. According to data from May in Xinjiang, the companys revenue share in domestic and overseas markets is 2:8, with North America alone accounting for 40%. In recent years, Australia, the United States and other countries which frequently clamor for the China Threat Theory have fallen into the True Fragrance Law in front of Xinjiang.

Source: Guo Ping_B7442, Responsible Editor of Observer Network