The Scottish Court of Justice ruled that it was illegal for the Prime Minister to close Parliament

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 The Scottish Court of Justice ruled that it was illegal for the Prime Minister to close Parliament


Xinhua News Agency, London, September 11 - The Scottish High Civil Court ruled on September 11 that the British Prime Minister Johnsons move to adjourn Parliament was illegal. The government said it would appeal to the British Supreme Court.

Earlier, a group of more than 70 members of the House of Commons of the British Parliament sued the Scottish High Civil Court for a ruling that Johnson had closed Parliament in violation of the law. The prosecution was dismissed by the court on 30 August on the grounds that the Prime Ministers decision to request the Queens approval of the parliamentary adjournment was a political decision and should not be decided by the court.

Parliamentary bodies appealed to the Scottish High Civil Court in early September. Three judges of the Courts Review Department ruled on 11 that it was illegal for the Prime Minister to request the Queens approval to suspend the British Parliament from 9 to 12 on a selective basis until 14 October.

The summary of the judgment issued by the Court pointed out that Johnsons request for the adjournment of Parliament had two main purposes: to prevent or hinder Parliament from allowing the executive to perform its duties and to legislate on Britains de-Europeanization, and to allow the executive to adopt a non-agreement de-Europeanization policy without parliamentary intervention. The court therefore ruled that it was illegal and invalid to request the parliament to adjourn.

Joanna Cherry, MP of the Scottish National Party, who led the prosecution, said the courts ruling was a tremendous victory. A spokesman for the British Prime Ministers Office said he was disappointed with the courts ruling and would appeal to the British Supreme Court.

Johnson submitted a request for parliamentary adjournment in late August and was approved by Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom. The parliament adjourned from September 10 until October 14. At that time, Britain was only half a month from the end of October deadline for de-Europe. This decision has aroused strong opposition in the British government and the countryside. Public opinion criticized Johnsons move to squeeze parliamentary time and set obstacles for parliamentarians to prevent the government from leaving Europe without an agreement.

The High Court of Justice rejected Gina Millers request to suspend Parliament on June 6, ruling that Johnsons request for an adjournment of Parliament was not illegal. The plaintiff later appealed to the British Supreme Court.

Source: Xinhua Responsible Editor: Chengyu_NBJ11143