First space crime! Same-sex spouse accounts of female astronauts in space intrusion were checked

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 First space crime! Same-sex spouse accounts of female astronauts in space intrusion were checked


According to the New York Times on August 24, American astronaut Anne McLean has been charged with unauthorized access to her same-sex spouses bank account at the International Space Station. McLean pleaded guilty to the charges, but insisted that nothing was wrong.

Currently, NASA and the Federal Trade Commission are investigating. It is worth mentioning that space is not an extrajudicial place, according to the existing space law, if an astronaut commits a crime, then he will also be punished by the law of that country.

The New York Times reported that Anne McLeans spouse was Samo Warden, a former US Air Force intelligence officer who had a son. But the good times are not long. At the beginning of 2018, there was a crack in their emotions, and their son became the focus of their struggle.

In early 2018, McLean went to Houstons courts to consult on custody issues. She also told the judge that Warden was hot-tempered and would make bad financial decisions. Meanwhile, McLean also posted pictures of her in a spacesuit with her son on Twitter.

Tutu from McLean Twitter

In this regard, Walden believes that McLean is sworn to the childs sovereignty. At the end of 2018, Warden voluntarily filed a divorce petition with the court. But then McLean boarded the International Space Station because of his mission, and the divorce case was put on hold.

After McLean flew into the universe, Walden found that his bank account had been visited. After a period of investigation, she found that the computers logged into her account belonged to NASAs network, and she suspected that McLean was on mission at the International Space Station.

When NASA learned about this, it quickly contacted McLean. In July, Warden accused the Federal Trade Commission of identity theft (obtaining credit cards, other items or withdrawing cash from other peoples accounts by using other peoples names, personal information, etc.) and improper access to private property.

In response, McLean said in an interview in August that she did visit her bank account without permission, but she did nothing wrong just to make sure the family had enough money to support her son. Harding, McLeans lawyer, said: She strongly denies that she has done anything wrong.

On Twitter 24, McLean said that these statements were undoubtedly untrue and regretted that the painful separation had been exposed to the media. She would respond to the time after the investigation.

Tutu from McLean Twitter

Meanwhile, NASA also issued a statement saying that McLean was a top astronaut and she performed well on the space station. Like other employees, NASA would not comment on their personal affairs. At present, the investigation is still under way, and the divorce case between the two will be completed in October this year.

McLean has been involved in space missions many times. NASA calls it the top astronaut (left-most McLean) from NASA.

With the gradual progress of human beings towards the universe, more space-related crimes have been committed. According to the New York Times, in 2011, NASA led the arrest of a woman who sold moon stones. In 2017, an Austrian businessman sued a space travel company for paying a deposit for a space trip, but the company did nothing.

However, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) still calls McLeans case the first allegation of a crime committed in space.

So what punishment would be imposed if space crimes were committed?

Space is not an illegal place, Mark Sandal, of the Center for Global Space Law Research at Cleveland State University, told the New York Times.

The BBC reports that five countries and regions with space stations - the United States, Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada - have stipulated within the legal framework that national laws apply to people and property in space.

International Space Station Map from Visual China

Therefore, if Canadian citizens commit crimes in space, they will be bound by Canadian law, while Russian citizens will be bound by Russian law. As a country, Europe exists within the legal framework, but any European country can extend its laws and regulations to European space equipment and personnel. If a country decides to prosecute a citizen of another country for space misconduct, space law also provides for extradition to Earth. So far, however, there is no opportunity for the law to be put into practice. Source: Author of Observer: Zhao Noah, Editor-in-Charge: Wang Ning_NB12468

Therefore, if Canadian citizens commit crimes in space, they will be bound by Canadian law, while Russian citizens will be bound by Russian law. As a country, Europe exists within the legal framework, but any European country can extend its laws and regulations to European space equipment and personnel.

If a country decides to prosecute a citizen of another country for space misconduct, space law also provides for extradition to Earth. So far, however, there is no opportunity for the law to be put into practice.