Singaporean Airlines has operated Concorde Aircraft? Why only half of the fuselage is painted?

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 Singaporean Airlines has operated Concorde Aircraft? Why only half of the fuselage is painted?


As one of the few commercial supersonic civil aviation airliners in the world, Concorde Airlines has received a rather cold reaction after it was introduced into the market.

Although many multinational airlines, including China Civil Aviation, have thought about buying Concorde, in fact, only British Airlines and French Airlines in the R&D countries are actually ordering.

Therefore, in most peoples impression, Concorde carriers are only British Airways and Air France. But is this statement really rigorous?

In fact, if we really look at the history of Concordes operations, we will find an interesting fact that Singapore Airlines has operated Concorde Airlines.

Of course, we put quotation marks on the above operation, because Singapore Airlines can only be regarded as half of the operators to be more accurate. This is also an interesting story for aviation history.

Although Singapore Airlines used to be an intentional customer of Concorde Aircraft, it did not actually buy Concorde Aircraft. This also raises the question, is this photo a modern technology PS?

Of course not. Thats what we call the Concorde Aircraft operated by Singapore Airlines. Its registration number is G-BOAD.

But as we said above, Singapore Airlines is only a half operator, and the other half is actually British Airways, which actually purchased Concorde.

So this photo has its own secret. In fact, it only let you see the left side of Concorde, but the right side of the situation can be completely different.

Heres the right half of the plane, dressed in British Airways paint. Although airplanes as a whole can not be split in two, painting also declares the sovereignty of different airlines.

When passengers stand at different angles to observe the aircraft, they will draw completely different conclusions about its ownership.

On the other hand, this Concorde Photograph: Rob Hodgkins

As we said, British Airways and Singapore Airlines jointly operate the aircraft, both of which have equal responsibilities and obligations.

Although the Concorde pilots are from British Airways, this is not the case with the flight crew, which alternates between British Airways and Singapore Airlines.

Why is there such a business model?

Lets go back to Concordes operating history. In early 1976, Concorde went into operation, but the Concorde, which was supposed to be directly used for transatlantic flights, was resisted by the United States because of noise.

In this case, British Airways opened a flight from London to Bahrain and Air France opened a flight from Paris to Rio de Janeiro.

Although a few months later, the United States softened its attitude and allowed Concorde to try out flights to and from the United States, New Yorks Kennedy Airport refused to land the plane until October next year.

In the days when airplanes were available but routes could not be opened up, both BA and Air France began to look for new destinations, and it was at this time that Singapore entered the sights of BA.

What are the advantages of Singapore?

As Concorde cannot fly directly to Sydney, according to BAs plan, the route will extend from London-Bahrain to Singapore and Sydney. The first phase of the project is to turn the London-Bahrain route into the London-Bahrain-Singapore route.

At this time, it is normal for Singapore Airlines to participate in it. With the help of Singapore Airlines, things will obviously be much simpler.

After the flight started, it only took nine hours from London to Singapore, which counted the stopping time in Bahrain. Today, direct flights from London to Singapore still take 13 hours.

Of course, the project was not a success, because only three trips were made and the flight was suspended.

Although the operation was suspended, the painting was retained during those years.

Malaysia withdrew Concordes permission to fly at supersonic speeds across the Strait of Malacca, citing the noise of supersonic airliners and their potential impact on the environment.

The airline industry argued that Malaysias decision was politically motivated, as Malaysia was trying to compete for more take-off and landing times and fifth airline rights in London Heathrow.

In fact, Malaysia is not the only country to do so. Before the launch of the route, India also refused to allow Concorde to fly at supersonic speed in its airspace, forcing the route to take more than 300 kilometers, adding 10 minutes.

The reasons given by India are similar to those given by Malaysia, but it should be noted that India was also competing for the instant interests of London Heathrow Airport.

With the joint efforts of British Airlines and Singapore Airlines, the route resumed on January 24, 1979, but chose to bypass Indian and Malaysian airspace. However, on November 1, 1980, the London-Singapore coordinated flight service was officially terminated.

It is not difficult to guess the reason for the end. Under the high ticket prices, fewer people are willing to take flights, coupled with the high operating costs after bypass, the two airlines can not make profits.

Airlines are expected to lose 2 million a year on this route (1980).

The flight service is over. What about the plane?

G-BOAD naturally returned to British Airways, and of course it was a legendary aircraft, the longest of all Concorde flights, and in 1996 it set the record for the fastest flight time on the New York-London route, taking only 2 hours, 52 minutes and 59 seconds from Kennedy Airport to Heathrow Airport.

Following the decommissioning of Concorde, on November 10, 2003, G-BOAD flew from Heathrow Airport in London to Kennedy Airport in New York, ending its flight career. It was then transferred to the Sea, Air and Space Museum of New Yorks Dreadnought for exhibition until today.

Now you can see G-BOAD in the museum, but its only painted by British Airways.

Source: Liable Editor of Netease Aviation Special Paper: Lin Zhiheng_NY9285