IMF: China has not intervened in the RMB exchange rate on a large scale

category:Finance
 IMF: China has not intervened in the RMB exchange rate on a large scale


At the same time, the IMF also calls for promoting the RMB exchange rate formation mechanism, making it more flexible and market-oriented, and strengthening the transparency of the exchange rate system. The IMF also revealed that the U.S. Treasury Department is currently in consultation with China on a range of issues, but did not disclose the specific content of the consultation.

In the report, the IMF believes that Chinas economy is facing uncertainties caused by external resistance and trade frictions. The stimulus policy adopted by the Chinese government will partly offset the negative impact of the tariff imposed by the United States on Chinese goods. The report also points out that Chinas reform in key areas is making progress. Strengthening financial supervision and controlling local government expenditure both reduce debt accumulation and help to restrain financial risks. The IMF report also affirms a series of reform measures in China, such as tariff reduction, the new Foreign Investment Law and the revised negative list of foreign investment access. At the same time, the IMF calls for further opening up, accelerating the reform of state-owned enterprises and boosting medium-term growth through structural fiscal reform. (Originally titled IMF: China does not intervene in the RMB exchange rate on a large scale). Source of this article: Peng Mei News Responsible Editor: Han Yukun_NBJ11142

In the report, the IMF believes that Chinas economy is facing uncertainties caused by external resistance and trade frictions. The stimulus policy adopted by the Chinese government will partly offset the negative impact of the tariff imposed by the United States on Chinese goods.

The report also points out that Chinas reform in key areas is making progress. Strengthening financial supervision and controlling local government expenditure both reduce debt accumulation and help to restrain financial risks. The IMF report also affirms a series of reform measures in China, such as tariff reduction, the new Foreign Investment Law and the revised negative list of foreign investment access. At the same time, the IMF calls for further opening up, accelerating the reform of state-owned enterprises and boosting medium-term growth through structural fiscal reform.

(Originally titled IMF: China does not intervene in the RMB exchange rate on a large scale)