France takes the lead in legislation: Internet platforms pay for original news content

category:Internet
 France takes the lead in legislation: Internet platforms pay for original news content


Beijing, July 24, Science and Technology Daily (Internship Reporter Wang Yuquan) According to the Physicist Organization Network 23, the French Parliament incorporated the Copyright Law Reform Act passed by the European Parliament in March into the national law that day, and France became the first EU country to pass the Act. The bill aims to ensure that news media can be paid when original news content is published on technology giant websites such as Google and Facebook.

We are proud to be the first country to incorporate the EU Act into national law, which is essential to French democracy and the independence and freedom of the press, said Frank Rister, French Minister of Culture.

Media organizations strongly support the protection of the copyright of original content, and they want to earn revenue from a network platform that allows media users to publish original content.

The move was strongly opposed by free Internet advocates, who said it amounted to a link tax that would curb freedom of speech on the Internet, and by Silicon Valley, especially Google, which had already made huge profits in advertising while publishing content on news pages. ASIC, a technology company association comprising Google and Facebook, argues that the provisions of the bill do not clearly define freedom of information flow and copyright protection. However, major news and publishing organizations, including AFP, have been working hard to promote the reform, which is seen as an urgent remedy to ensure the quality of news products and increase revenue for traditional media companies. It is reported that the EU Copyright Act will be implemented in all Member States in April next year. Source of this article: responsible editor of Science and Technology Daily: Wang Fengzhi_NT2541

The move was strongly opposed by free Internet advocates, who said it amounted to a link tax that would curb freedom of speech on the Internet, and by Silicon Valley, especially Google, which had already made huge profits in advertising while publishing content on news pages.

ASIC, a technology company association comprising Google and Facebook, argues that the provisions of the bill do not clearly define freedom of information flow and copyright protection.

However, major news and publishing organizations, including AFP, have been working hard to promote the reform, which is seen as an urgent remedy to ensure the quality of news products and increase revenue for traditional media companies.

It is reported that the EU Copyright Act will be implemented in all Member States in April next year.