Thrilling! The US Coast Guard jumped on a drug trafficker ship and seized 7.7 tons of drugs.

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 Thrilling! The US Coast Guard jumped on a drug trafficker ship and seized 7.7 tons of drugs.


The U.S. Coast Guard jumped on a drug dealer submarine and seized 7.7 tons of drugs (source:)

On July 11, local time, the U.S. Coast Guard released a live video of a drug ship interception at sea. The whole process was thrilling.

According to CNN, on June 18, the U.S. Coast Guard chased a drug-smuggling semi-submarine in a speedboat in the high seas of the East Pacific Ocean and successfully intercepted it at sea.

The Coast Guard seized more than 17,000 pounds of cocaine (about 7.7 tons) on board, worth about $232 million (about 1.6 billion yuan).

Video shows members of the Coast Guard shouting stop in Spanish while chasing the upper half of the submarine in a speedboat. After approaching, members of the Coast Guard jumped onto the ship and slapped the hatch door vigorously. The ships poisoner finally opened the hatch and surrendered.

Drug trafficking is rampant in Central and South America, and Coast Guard Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Brickey told CNN that the use of such semi-submersible vessels has increased in the past four years. Bridge said that semi-submarines are expensive to build, and drug gangs must build them deep in the jungle to avoid detection. Once they are filled with drugs and deployed, they are almost impossible to find without prior intelligence or aircraft detection, because most of the hulls are below the surface and difficult to identify. Even if drug carriers were found, it would not be easy to successfully intercept them, because drug traffickers would sink and destroy evidence in minutes. In addition, 70% of the coastguard ships have been over 50 years old, and a lot of maintenance work is needed before carrying out their duties. Bridge said only about 11% of the drug-carrying semi-submarines would be successfully intercepted. Source: Responsible Editor of Observer Network: Liu Yuxin_NBJS7825

Drug trafficking is rampant in Central and South America, and Coast Guard Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Brickey told CNN that the use of such semi-submersible vessels has increased in the past four years.

Bridge said that semi-submarines are expensive to build, and drug gangs must build them deep in the jungle to avoid detection. Once they are filled with drugs and deployed, they are almost impossible to find without prior intelligence or aircraft detection, because most of the hulls are below the surface and difficult to identify.

Even if drug carriers were found, it would not be easy to successfully intercept them, because drug traffickers would sink and destroy evidence in minutes. In addition, 70% of the coastguard ships have been over 50 years old, and a lot of maintenance work is needed before carrying out their duties. Bridge said only about 11% of the drug-carrying semi-submarines would be successfully intercepted.