Russian T-80U Tank Show Fruit Cutting Skills Attracted Attention of American Media

category:Military
 Russian T-80U Tank Show Fruit Cutting Skills Attracted Attention of American Media


Reference News Network reported on July 12 that according to an article entitled Transforming Russian Tanks into the Worlds Largest Fruit Cutter published on July 10 by the website of the monthly magazine Popular Machinery of the United States, visitors to the Russian Army-2019 Weapons Fair saw an interesting scene: a Russian main battle tank cuts fruit with a machete. According to reports, the weapons exhibition was held in Kubinka, a suburb of Moscow.

According to the article, on display at the exhibition site is a Russian T-80U main battle tank equipped with 2 A46 125mm tank gun. The 2A46 tank gun is usually equipped with armour-piercing projectiles or 9M119 reflection artillery to fire anti-tank missiles. But for this demonstration, the tank was equipped with an apparently low-tech weapon: a machete fixed at the muzzle.

Then the tank cut a watermelon and an apple in half. US media said it was not clear why this was done. The only possible reason was to show off the precise control that tank Gunners could exert at will. Modern tanks can hit targets beyond 4000 meters, so tank guns must be able to make very fine adjustments to hit distant targets.

Pictures show T-80U tank cutting fruit (Russian Red Star TV video screenshot)

The article points out that the T-80U is a cold war tank and is still serving in the Russian army. The old main battle tank was originally planned to withdraw from the Russian army with the advent of the new T-14 Amata main battle tank, but the cost and technical problems of the latter forced the Russian army to rely on old tanks like the T-80U.

Armies of all countries always use tanks to perform special effects. The U.S. Armys M1 Abrams main battle tank used tequila as fuel to prove that gas turbines are not picky about fuel. During the Cold War, the West German Army placed a glass of beer at the top of the barrel of the Panther-2 main battle tank to show that the 60-ton tank was able to keep its main gun on target during its march.

Source: Responsible Editor of Reference Message Network: Li Zaixing_NBJS9026