The U.S. House of Representatives will hold an anti-trust hearing: Facebook, Google and other executives will attend

category:Internet
 The U.S. House of Representatives will hold an anti-trust hearing: Facebook, Google and other executives will attend


Comprehensive report by Pengchao journalist Chen Yuxi

The U.S. House of Representatives will hold an anti-monopoly hearing on July 16 after the U.S. government launched an anti-monopoly investigation into large technology companies.

On July 10, Reuters reported that executives from Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google will testify at a hearing in the U.S. House of Representatives next week on the enormous market power of these Internet giants, with the theme of online platforms and market power.

According to a statement by the anti-monopoly panel of the U.S. House of Representatives Judicial Committee, executives at the hearing included Adam Cohen, head of economic policy at Google, Nate Sutton, deputy legal adviser at Amazon, Matt Perault, head of global policy development at Facebook, and Kyle Andeer, vice president of law at Apple.

In addition to business people, the participants included several antitrust experts, Timothy Wu, a professor at Columbia University Law School, who was a White House official during Obamas presidency and has been advocating strengthening antitrust enforcement and splitting Facebook. Yale professor Fiona Scott Morton will also testify.

The U.S. House Judicial Committee is investigating competition in the digital market as part of a survey released last month.

According to Reuters earlier reports, the U.S. government is launching anti-trust investigations against Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google, the four technology giants. Reuters said such a large-scale investigation may be unprecedented. The U.S. antitrust law is jointly regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the Justice Department. Amazon and Facebook are currently regulated by the Federal Trade Commission, while Apple and Google are regulated by the U.S. Justice Department.

Both Republicans and Democrats are concerned about the power of the worlds most valuable companies, Reuters said.

Source of this article: Peng Mei News Responsible Editor: Qiao Junyi_NBJ11279