First emergency flood warning in the history of heavy rain in Washington

category:Hot
 First emergency flood warning in the history of heavy rain in Washington


On July 8, the National Weather Service issued its first emergency flood warning in the history of Washington, D.C., and its surrounding areas because of heavy rains.

Earlier, U.S. media reported that rainfall at Reagan National Airport in Washington reached 3.3 inches per hour (83.82 mm). According to the Washington Post, this is equivalent to one months rainfall in an hour. The probability of such heavy rainfall in any year is less than 1%. This is also the first emergency flood warning issued in the Washington area, which began in 2011 and was set up for the most serious life-threatening and particularly dangerous incidents.

According to the New York Times, the morning rainstorm caused chaos in Washington: the subway station turned into a shower room, flooding the suburbs. Relevant departments say dozens of rescue operations have been launched.

Heavy rains have also severely damaged Washingtons public transport network. Rainwater poured into the subway station from escalators and elevators, the roof of the station was broken, and the waterfall formed by rainwater fell on the track. Amtrak said its services in Washington and surrounding areas were temporarily suspended on Monday and that it expected delays after the train resumed operation. Fire and rescue authorities in Fairfax County said they had responded to 55 rapid water rescue calls in the morning of July 8, including evacuating several residents from a trailer residential area. Thousands of people still have no electricity, but no casualties have been reported. Virginia and the suburbs of Maryland, bordering Washington, D.C., were the hardest hit. News footage and social media videos from local residents showed floods pouring down from clean communities and parks. The National Weather Service said the night hazard should be over on Monday (8), and sunny days on Tuesday (9) and Wednesday (10). Source: Liu Yuxin_NBJS7825

Heavy rains have also severely damaged Washingtons public transport network. Rainwater poured into the subway station from escalators and elevators, the roof of the station was broken, and the waterfall formed by rainwater fell on the track. Amtrak said its services in Washington and surrounding areas were temporarily suspended on Monday and that it expected delays after the train resumed operation.

Fire and rescue authorities in Fairfax County said they had responded to 55 rapid water rescue calls in the morning of July 8, including evacuating several residents from a trailer residential area. Thousands of people still have no electricity, but no casualties have been reported.

Virginia and the suburbs of Maryland, bordering Washington, D.C., were the hardest hit. News footage and social media videos from local residents showed floods pouring down from clean communities and parks.

The National Weather Service said the night hazard should be over on Monday (8), and sunny days on Tuesday (9) and Wednesday (10).