Opening Chinese Courses in African Countries Increases Foreign Media: Its too naive not to learn Chinese

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 Opening Chinese Courses in African Countries Increases Foreign Media: Its too naive not to learn Chinese


In a brightly lit classroom, about 20 pupils are singing Chinese songs enthusiastically. But this scene did not happen in a Chinese school, but in the Lekwood Premier School in Nairobi, Kenya, thousands of kilometers away.

Here, students are learning Mandarin Chinese. Nearly 1 billion people speak the language in a country about 8,000 kilometers from their home town.

Sandra Vangiru, 13, is one of hundreds of African students increasingly proficient in Chinese.

The report says that by 2020, more students will join them. At that time, all schools in Kenya will officially teach Chinese, just like French, Arabic and German, which are already included in the curriculum.

The Lakewood School of Excellence in Vangiru started the program a year earlier, giving its students a head start.

I chose to learn Chinese first because learning a foreign language is very interesting, and because I want to travel and do business in China, said Vangiru.

Kenya is not the only country where children are taught Chinese. In South Africa, Chinese has been an optional language course for students since 2016, while in December last year, some Ugandan secondary schools offered Chinese courses.

Henry Adramony, an expert at Ugandas National Curriculum Development Centre, said that Chinese was included in the curriculum because it was one of the working languages of the United Nations. Ugandan students can also choose to study French, Arabic, Latin or German at school.

We want to give young Ugandans the opportunity to go abroad for employment, education and business, he said. Thats why we give them the chance to learn Chinese.

Teachers participating in the program are trained by teachers from the Confucius Institute, a non-profit organization, according to the report.

The report points out that France has the largest number of cultural institutions in Africa, and China is second only to France. Given that China has no colonial ties with any country on the African continent, Chinas rise in this regard is remarkable. The continued expansion of Chinese cultural institutions on the African continent is part of Chinas strategy to enhance its influence in Africa through soft power, says Iria Karoza, a scholar of China-Africa relations at the London School of Economics and Politics. She also said that African governments believe that the introduction of Chinese and Chinese cultural institutions is an investment in the future of African young people. African governments hope that introducing Chinese into school curricula will enable future workers to get better jobs in China or in Chinese enterprises operating in Africa, she said. Russell Kashura, professor of African language studies at the University of Rhodes in South Africa, said that since China is a major trading partner of many countries on the African continent, Africans are too naive to learn Chinese. Source: Responsible Editor of Reference News Network: Liu Yuxin_NBJS7825

The report points out that France has the largest number of cultural institutions in Africa, and China is second only to France. Given that China has no colonial ties with any country on the African continent, Chinas rise in this regard is remarkable.

The continued expansion of Chinese cultural institutions on the African continent is part of Chinas strategy to enhance its influence in Africa through soft power, says Iria Karoza, a scholar of China-Africa relations at the London School of Economics and Politics.

She also said that African governments believe that the introduction of Chinese and Chinese cultural institutions is an investment in the future of African young people.

African governments hope that introducing Chinese into school curricula will enable future workers to get better jobs in China or in Chinese enterprises operating in Africa, she said.

Russell Kashura, professor of African language studies at the University of Rhodes in South Africa, said that since China is a major trading partner of many countries on the African continent, Africans are too naive to learn Chinese.