Scientist: The remains of a new human species 50,000 years ago were discovered in the Philippine caves

category:Hot
 Scientist: The remains of a new human species 50,000 years ago were discovered in the Philippine caves


BEIJING, April 11 (CNN) -- Scientists have recently unearthed an unknown human remains from a cave in the Philippines, according to CNN. Scientists call it the small human species Homo Luzonensis and think they may have lived 50,000 years ago.

The new discovery was published in the April 10 issue of the Journal Nature, the report said. Researchers say the latest human remains may be 50,000 years old, suggesting that several different human species may coexist in Southeast Asia.

More than a decade ago, when researchers reported that at least 67,000-year-old footbones had been found in the Karao Cave on Luzon Island, the Philippines, the first signs of new species began to emerge. Researchers were not sure which species the bone came from, but they reported that it resembled a small Homosapiens.

In recent years, researchers have discovered thigh bones, seven teeth, two foot bones and two hand bones, which have different characteristics from other human branches, when they further excavate the Karao cave. The study reports that at least two adults and one child were among the remains they unearthed.

The team is reportedly led by Paleontologist De Teoi of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris. Luzon Ancient Man is the second new human species discovered in Southeast Asia in recent years.

In 2004, another team announced the discovery of a human species, the Hobbit, on Flores Island, Indonesia, which scientists call the Homofloresiensis.

However, De Teoi and his colleagues believe that the remains of the Cave are different from those of Flores and other humans found on Flores Island, including a species called Homo erectus, believed to be the first human relative to leave Africa about 2 million years ago.

Source: Responsible Editor of China News Network: Youyuan_NO4712