US police mistake the convenience store customers as thieves to pull guns to force them to return merchandise.

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 US police mistake the convenience store customers as thieves to pull guns to force them to return merchandise.


The convenience stores surveillance video showed Joseph sitting at the checkout counter waiting for the cashier to find the money, and the police stood behind him. As the cashier lowered his head, he suddenly reached out and took away a box of small candy worth 1.19 dollars (7.5 yuan). The policeman who saw this scene thought that Joseph was a thief and sent it back to the candy. When Joseph argued that he had paid the money, the police took a pistol out of his pocket, showed his identity as a police officer, and put it back in place again. Joseph, who saw the pistol exclaimed, reluctantly returned the candy to the cashier. At that time, the cashier was ready to find Josephs money. The police ordered him to take the money quickly and leave. I have paid the money! Joseph said, as he did, I have paid the money! but he had been ignored by the police until he took the good money to the side, and the policeman asked the cashier, did he pay? The cashiers answer was yes, but the police seemed unwilling to believe it and repeated it several times. Finally, he confirmed that Joseph had already paid the police and apologized to Joseph, and asked him to take the candy back. Joseph told the matter to his wife waiting outside the convenience store. After deliberation, he decided to complain to the police. What saddened me most was not that he was pointing a gun at him, but his arrogant attitude. He commanded me to be like a piece of junk! Joseph said. He also said he did not want the police to lose their jobs, but hoped that he would be well trained. At present, the police refused to disclose the name of the police, but said they are actively investigating the incident. The source of this article: Global Times - global network. More brilliant, please log on to World Wide Web http://www.huanqiu.com responsible editor: Li Hang _BJS4645