Google releases Gmails new feature: helping users write mail more easily

category:Internet
 Google releases Gmails new feature: helping users write mail more easily


At present, SmartCompose offers a limited range of suggestions that will not fundamentally change the way users write e-mail, but it is an interesting way to observe Google AI and save some time. The GSuite user will then get the SmartCompose function. The SmartCompose function is an extension of Google intelligent reply SmartReplies function. At present, SmartReplies can provide three suggestions for users when launching e-mail Gmail. Gmail has recently released this feature to desktop users. In testing, SmartCompose is best at completing greetings or finishing simple questions, such as Whatsupwithyou? (what?). Or Whereareyou (where are you?) If a user sends an email on Friday, it can also add context phrases such as happy weekend, and sometimes it can guess exactly which words you want to end the sentence. The function is very simple and easy to use: the user only needs to start typing as usual, if Google recommends something you want to use - a gray text that pops in front of the cursor - the user can press the Tab button to accept the proposal. For now, SmartCompose will not tailor the users writing style, and the scope of its recommendations is rather limited, so it can only save a little time. In spite of this, it is interesting to use the function to reflect the great ambition of Googles products with artificial intelligence to make it easier for daily tasks to be more efficient. SmartCompose uses the same email scanning method that has long been used by Gmail to scavenging spam and phishing (Google stopped using scanning e-mails last year to help ads). The new feature will be available to ordinary users in the next few weeks. Gmail users who pay advanced GSuite fees can be tried in a few months. To turn on the SmartCompose function, users simply go to Settings and then enable experimental access. At present, this function is only applicable to desktop and English users. (Han ice)