Nokia develops water cooling technology for base stations, saying it can reduce energy consumption by 30 percent

category:Internet
 Nokia develops water cooling technology for base stations, saying it can reduce energy consumption by 30 percent


Netease Technologies News, March 6, CNBC reported that mobile phones that can take photos, access the Internet and make phone calls usually rely on base station networks, which use antennas to send and receive radio waves. Traditionally, base stations are usually cooled by fans, but Nokia, a Finnish technology company, has developed base stations using liquid cooling.

Harry Kusa, spokesman for Nokia Networks, said: Traditionally, base stations are cooled by air, but Nokias innovation uses liquid as a coolant. In terms of cooling base stations, liquid cooling is more efficient than air cooling. Kusa also explained that this meant that the base station no longer needed cooling systems such as air conditioning and fans, energy consumption could be reduced by about 30%, and carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced by 80%. In December 2018, Nokia announced that it had deployed liquid cooling base stations in an apartment building in Helsinki in cooperation with Elisa and Efore. Nokia said that the heat of the base station was redirected to heat the building, which would help reduce energy costs in the process. Source of this article: Responsible Editor of Netease Science and Technology Report: Wang Fengzhi_NT2541

Harry Kusa, spokesman for Nokia Networks, said: Traditionally, base stations are cooled by air, but Nokias innovation uses liquid as a coolant. In terms of cooling base stations, liquid cooling is more efficient than air cooling. Kusa also explained that this meant that the base station no longer needed cooling systems such as air conditioning and fans, energy consumption could be reduced by about 30%, and carbon dioxide emissions could be reduced by 80%.

In December 2018, Nokia announced that it had deployed liquid cooling base stations in an apartment building in Helsinki in cooperation with Elisa and Efore. Nokia said that the heat of the base station was redirected to heat the building, which would help reduce energy costs in the process. (small)