Airbnb landlords killing of tenants who cant afford their rent is called manslaughter by negligence

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 Airbnb landlords killing of tenants who cant afford their rent is called manslaughter by negligence


According to the BBC, Jasons landlord, Irbnb, admitted killing a tenant who couldnt pay his rent in his Australian home, but denied that he was guilty of murder and claimed that he was guilty of manslaughter.

In October 2017, a tenant named Ramis Jonuzi stayed in Jasons room hanging on Airbnb. Jonuzi rented Jasons room and his roommates room for three nights, then asked for an extension of one week at the cost of A$210. However, when he checked out, he found that he had less than A$10 in his account and could not pay the rent.

Jason and his roommate asked him for rent at 8 p.m. when he was packing up and leaving. Prosecutors said Jason was the first person to attack Jonuzi. He grabbed him, threw him on the wall and began to strangle him. The prosecutor said.

After Jonuzi lost consciousness, his roommate dragged him into the garden to continue the violence. The court broadcast a surveillance video of the scene of the crime, which showed Jonuzi lying half naked in front of the house, with a noticeable nose injury and blood stains on her face.

But Jason said he didnt know that his actions would kill the victim. He said he just wanted to make him unconscious. If the jury accepts his manslaughter, he may be sentenced to 20 yearsimprisonment. However, if he is convicted of murder, he will face life imprisonment.

In recent years, Airbnb, a technology start-up, has subverted the traditional business model of residential accommodation through technology. It has grown rapidly in the past ten years since its launch and has been loved by many young backpackers. But at the same time, many people complain deeply about the company.

A $21 million lawsuit has led to a dispute between communities and short-rent platforms

It is reported that about 2 million people rent in Airbnb every day, but at the same time many communities have disputes with them.

According to the New York Times, in recent years, residents in the neighbourhood of the KipBay Building in Manhattan have noticed that more and more people are carrying suitcases into and out of the neighbourhood. Many residents say they often hear the rolling sound of luggage pulleys passing through the floor of their apartments. They speculate that these people may be short-term tenants Booking their apartments through Airbnb.

In January, residentssuspicions were confirmed. The City filed a $21 million lawsuit against a group of real estate brokers accusing them of using Airbnb to illegally rent the KipBay building and 34 other apartments in Manhattan.

According to the BBC, a study found that the average income of short-rent service providers on Airbnb is two to three times that of long-Rent service providers. There are concerns that owners are moving from long-term leases to profitable short-term leases, which will lead to higher rents and worsen housing shortages.

Last year, New York City pushed for a bill requiring online leasing platforms to hand over host data in an attempt to crack down on operators. New York City Councillor Karina said the bill aims to protect affordable housing for millions of New Yorkers who would not be able to live without it.

Although Airbnb accounts for only a small portion of the housing market in most cities, it accounts for a larger proportion of certain communities, such as the old urban areas of Barcelona.

A study in 2015 showed that Airbnb provided only 9.6% of Barcelonas total housing supply, but the proportion rose to 16.8% in the old urban areas. At present, Barcelona has stopped issuing new tourist housing permits, without which short-term leases are illegal. The Government of Barcelona stated that illegal leasing led to speculation and illegal economic phenomena and that its activities would not have any positive impact on local residents.

Although many people fear that the rise of Airbnb will lead to housing shortages, over-exploitation of tourism resources and destruction of communities, the company also provides a lot of positive experiences for tenants, such as cheap and in-depth travel experience that can penetrate local communities.

The increasingly blurred legal boundary in the Internet Era

According to Wired magazine, Airbnbs lawsuit against American cities seems to have become a monthly ritual. The company filed a lawsuit against San Francisco in June 2016 after the city introduced a law to combat illegal short-term apartment leases. A month later, it sued Anaheim for the same reason. In September, it sued Santa Monica. In October, it confronted New York City and New York State.

Although the details of the four cases are different, they have one thing in common: Airbnb must ensure that its users comply with the new regulations, otherwise the company will face huge fines.

Airbnbs lawyers are confident in supporting their defence with section 230 of the Federal Code of Communications Act. This landmark legislation is often considered to be the most important tool for creating freedom of expression for the Internet. It gives online platforms legal immunity from most of the content they publish to their users. Without the bill, there would probably be no Facebook, Amazon or Twitter today.

However, the laws enacted 20 years ago for publishers clearly do not apply to todays Internet.

In June 2016, the judge ordered Yelp to delete comments deemed defamatory. In August, Twitter was told it could not use the legal provision in lawsuits against Twitter. In September, a woman stabbed by a netizen filed a $10 million lawsuit against the operator, and federal judges accepted the womans claim. In many cases, judges have turned a deaf ear to Article 230, and the legal boundary has become increasingly blurred under the impact of Internet technology. But some analysts say its more like political mediation than legal issues. No matter how the law changes, local governments just want technology giants to become taxpayers. For the supporters of article 230, they are more concerned about whether Airbnb will cause domino effects and whether the authorities will replicate these precedents on other suppliers. Source: Foreign Affairs Author: Editor-in-Charge of Fang Chen: Su Honghong_NBJ9980

In June 2016, the judge ordered Yelp to delete comments deemed defamatory. In August, Twitter was told it could not use the legal provision in lawsuits against Twitter. In September, a woman stabbed by a netizen filed a $10 million lawsuit against the operator, and federal judges accepted the womans claim.

In many cases, judges have turned a deaf ear to Article 230, and the legal boundary has become increasingly blurred under the impact of Internet technology. But some analysts say its more like political mediation than legal issues. No matter how the law changes, local governments just want technology giants to become taxpayers.

For the supporters of article 230, they are more concerned about whether Airbnb will cause domino effects and whether the authorities will replicate these precedents on other suppliers.