Animal protection organizations accused of killing more than 200 dogs

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 Animal protection organizations accused of killing more than 200 dogs


In November 2018, under pressure from animal protection organizations, the Korean government closed the Dapingdong comprehensive slaughterhouse, South Koreas largest dog slaughterhouse, which was regarded as a landmark victory for Korean dog lovers. CARE, one of the largest animal rights protection organizations in Korea, is an important pusher behind it.

But according to media reports, CARE has been accused of quietly killing more than 200 dogs rescued by the organization, and then changing the dogs condition to adopted in order to make room for more dogs to receive sustained public donations.

In recent years, there have been many reports about the disadvantages of animal protection organizations. Many people believe that the no killing policy pursued by these organizations is slowly killing animals. Whether these institutions have helped animals or put them in a worse position seems to be a perpetual question.

Kill the big dog to get a continuing donation

In Korea, it is a tradition to eat dog meat. About one million dogs are brought to the table every year, especially in summer. Now, Korean society has been divided about eating dog meat. As Koreans increasingly accept the idea of keeping dogs as pets, this tradition is fading away. Nowadays, eating dog meat has become a taboo among young Koreans.

Staff said that more than 230 dogs rescued by CARE were euthanized due to insufficient shelter space and were later classified as adopted. Figure CARE

CARE, an animal rights protection organization, is one of the pioneers who advocate no dog meat in Korea, and has been advocating no killing policy. CARE has about 23,000 members. Over the years, many dog rescue operations have been launched throughout Korea. More than 2 billion won ($1.8 million) of donations are received annually for dog rescue from slaughterhouses or dog farms.

However, according to the Asian News Network on January 14, CARE was recently accused of quietly killing more than 200 dogs rescued by the organization, and then changing the dogs condition to adopted in order to make room for more dogs to receive sustained public donations.

CARE employees told Korean National News that Park Zhaoyan, president of the association, ordered more than 230 dogs rescued from the dog market to be euthanized because there was not enough space. More than 230 dogs were killed, equivalent to a quarter of the number recently rescued by CARE. One employee said that only 10% of euthanized dogs suffered from incurable diseases, while the vast majority were due to their size. Later, the dogs condition will be changed to adopted. On January 13, CARE employees protested against the resignation of Park Zhaoyan.

According to reports, CARE has always maintained that dogs will not be killed even if they are not adopted. But Park Zhaoyan previously said in a statement that since 2015, with increasing demand for rescue, it is inevitable that a small number of dogs will be killed. She added that only aggressive or incurable dogs would be killed and CARE would do its best to treat them before making a decision.

_Animals left in shelters either find a carefully screened owner or accept euthanasia. Graph based network

CARE is not a rare problem. When animal shelters and rescue organizations that adhere to the no killing policy have long been full, they have only two choices: to evict the majority and adopt the minority, or to adopt them in dirty and heavily crowded warehouses for weeks, months or even years. Most of the animals excluded from the shelter face the threat of death; the animals left in the shelter either find a carefully screened owner or accept euthanasia.

The No Killing Policy is in a Dilemma

In recent years, the chaos in animal shelters, which pursue the no killing policy, has frequently appeared in the headlines, and the fate of these animals is far worse than death.

_In recent years, the chaos in animal shelters, which pursue the no killing policy, has frequently appeared in the headlines, and the fate of these animals is far worse than death. Pictures from The Los Angeles Times

The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), Britains largest animal charity, said on its official website: Every animal we take care of deserves a home full of love forever. However, the Daily Mail reported in August last year that the agency provided only about 44,000 new homes last year, one third of the 115,000 animals it rescued. This figure has once again raised concerns that RSPCA euthanized its adopted animals too quickly.

In August 2018, RSPCA confirmed to the Daily Mail that 28.9% of all animals rescued in 2017 had been euthanized, and insisted that no healthy, adoptive animals had been euthanized in that year. But the agency was unable to provide details of the remaining 70,000 homeless animals.

Before that, RSPCA had admitted that they had wrongly euthanized some animals. In 2012, 44% of rescued animals were euthanized by RSPCA, of which 3400 were slaughtered for non-medical reasons, such as inadequate space in kennels and cathouse.

Veterinary surgeon Stewart said: RSPCA has something wrong. They neglect their own work of preventing animal abuse and are only interested in publicizing, profiting from violence and exercising the rights of animal police.

According to the Washington Times, documents from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS), a 2010 inspection conducted by VDACS showed that the famous animal rights organization PETA was located in a shelter in Virginia, USA, and 84% of animals died within 24 hours of receiving. In 2014, PETA euthanized 2324 dogs and cats, accounting for 88% of all animals rescued in shelters. In 2016, PETA killed 71.9% of cats and dogs in its shelter.

Animal rights groups are voicing animal rights while signing death warrants for dogs and cats, Will Kokin, research director at the Consumer Freedom Center, a non-profit organization, said in a statement. This organization should be called a slaughterhouse, not an animal shelter.

In April 2018, the New York State Auditor Generals Office issued a report that dogs seized in New York State needed better protection from euthanasia or transfer. According to USA Today, the report points out that animal shelters give adequate care to captured dogs, but some of them are not held long enough before they are euthanized or transferred.

A New York State audit reported that the New York Animal Shelter did a good job of protecting dogs, but in a few cases they euthanized dogs too quickly. Pictures from the Auditor Generals Office in New York

According to local regulations, dogs can be confiscated and taken to shelters if they are found to be unlicensed, to pose a threat to public safety, or not to wear identification certificates in their ownersproperty. Dogs that are not claimed by their owners after a five-day redemption period can be sent for adoption, transfer or euthanasia.

However, dog euthanasia occurs from time to time during the redemption period. At the Saskequihana Animal Shelter in Ozgo, there were incidents in which dogs were euthanized on the day they were brought in. Most of the reasons for these tragedies are due to the no killing policy, which keeps the shelter full for a long time and makes it unable to help more new animals.

In a commentary, the New York Times pointed out that no killing policies were helpful, but without the help of adoptive families, they could make the situation of animals worse.

Source: Red Star News Responsible Editor: Ji Xueying_NN6784