Mexicos oil pipeline explosion killed 85 people because of stealing oil is more profitable than drug trafficking

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 Mexicos oil pipeline explosion killed 85 people because of stealing oil is more profitable than drug trafficking


The Mexican oil pipeline explosion, which killed 85 people, has attracted worldwide attention. According to CNN news, a ruptured oil pipeline in central Mexico exploded and caught fire on the 18th, killing 85 people. The cause of the incident was the theft of fuel by local residents. According to live video shows, there were dozens of people gathered to fill leaking oil with containers such as suitcases and garbage cans, but unexpectedly the pipeline suddenly caught fire and exploded.

In Mexico, an important oil producer, the problem of oil theft has become a serious social problem. Mexico loses at least $3 billion a year because of oil theft. There are nearly 13,000 underground oil theft sites in the country, and as many as 1700 in the state of Hidalgo where the explosion took place. Against the backdrop of the Mexican governments severe crackdown, why do fuel mice continue to be banned?

Economics

In recent years, Mexicos economic growth has been slow and employment situation is not optimistic. In 2018, Mexicos economic growth rate was about 2%, and the proportion of urban unemployed people was about 3.4%. In 2018, Mexicos world competitiveness ranking declined. In addition, the World Bank has lowered Mexicos economic growth forecast for 2019 due to the uncertainty brought about by the change of government and the difficulties in attracting foreign investment.

At the same time, Latin Americas labor market is more complex. Because there are a lot of informal employment in Mexicos labor market, the open unemployment rate can not fully reflect the development of Mexicos labor market. The 2010 figures show that Mexico has 11 million informal employees, which are not included in the open unemployment rate. These workers, who are not registered with the Social Insurance Bureau or the Civil Servant Social Insurance and Service Bureau, are vulnerable to inflation and are relatively vulnerable to the impact of the crisis. Once Mexicos economic downturn is serious, it is likely that this part of the population will fall below the poverty line and become poor.

By contrast, oil theft brings high returns. A Mexican can earn up to 14,000 Mexican pesos a month (about 4,970 yuan) by stealing oil, nearly six times the minimum wage in Mexico. Stealing a few barrels of petrol earns much more money than planting a years crop, so some people choose to take risks and take the road to stealing oil.

Politics

Mexicos oil theft, which can cost Mexico $3 billion a year, has been repeatedly prohibited and has formed a criminal network, with the shadow of Mexican officials and employees of oil companies behind it.

In order to combat fuel theft, Mexican President Ovladol decided in December 2018 to temporarily close the main oil pipeline, inspect illegally installed valves and switch to tanker trucks for fuel transportation. But that has also led to insufficient fuel supply in central Mexico and a rise in black market prices. High prices on the black market have further encouraged officials from oil companies to soldiers, police and criminal gangs to participate in oil theft. Some local enterprises and gas stations have also sold stolen gasoline secretly.

Many interest groups are deeply involved in illegal fuel trading, reflecting the serious corruption in Mexico. The problem of corruption in Mexico can be traced back to colonial times. Mexico has set up a system of public affairs governance that integrates corruption rules since colonial times, and has gradually made the logic of corruption a part of political and cultural traditions. After independence, Mexico inherited the system on the basis of partial changes, and corruption has not been eradicated. Many presidents who came to power under the slogan of anti-corruption eventually left with corruption scandals.

Sociology

In Mexico, there is a close interest chain between drug traffickers and some government officials. Drug traffickers gain influence on local governments by solving political problems such as demonstrations and demonstrations and bribing government officials on wages, and further manipulate the police to release their criminal activities or collude with the police to seize illegal interests.

Over the past few years, Mexican drug traffickers have been severely hit by the governments war on drugs, but they soon discovered a new source of money that does not need to cross the border to smuggle drugs - the smuggling of fuel. Gasoline on the black market is even more profitable than drug trafficking, and the competition among some Mexican gangs for this lucrative market has become the main cause of the escalation of violence in the region. They get pipeline information by bribing or killing oil company employees. Because of the collusion between drug trafficking groups and the police, the police turned a blind eye to these crimes. Poverty, corruption and criminal violence are rampant... The problem of fuel theft in front of Ovladol is no longer a simple crime problem. He faces a dilemma: the measures to combat fuel theft have led to a national oil shortage, and the reform of the whole national public governance system is involved in his attempt to further eradicate it. Mexico still has a long way to go to solve the oil rat problem thoroughly. Source: Author of Overseas Network: Dai Shangyun, responsible editor: Ji Guojie_NBJ11143

Over the past few years, Mexican drug traffickers have been severely hit by the governments war on drugs, but they soon discovered a new source of money that does not need to cross the border to smuggle drugs - the smuggling of fuel. Gasoline on the black market is even more profitable than drug trafficking, and the competition among some Mexican gangs for this lucrative market has become the main cause of the escalation of violence in the region. They get pipeline information by bribing or killing oil company employees. Because of the collusion between drug trafficking groups and the police, the police turned a blind eye to these crimes.

Poverty, corruption and criminal violence are rampant... The problem of fuel theft in front of Ovladol is no longer a simple crime problem. He faces a dilemma: the measures to combat fuel theft have led to a national oil shortage, and the reform of the whole national public governance system is involved in his attempt to further eradicate it. Mexico still has a long way to go to solve the oil rat problem thoroughly.