British mathematician Artea died last year, claiming to have proved Riemanns conjecture.

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 British mathematician Artea died last year, claiming to have proved Riemanns conjecture.


Sir Michael Francis Atiyah, a mathematician, died at the age of 89, according to an obituary issued by the Royal Society on January 11, local time. Atia claimed in September 2018 that she had proved the Riemann conjecture.

Michael Atiard is a high-profile double winner of the Fields and Abel Prizes, the highest honors in mathematics. He won the Fields Medal in 1966 and the Abel Prize in 2004. Attias most popular concern is his Tiyah-Singer index theorem, which is also regarded as his best thing done.

On September 24, 2018, 89-year-old Michael Attia gave a demonstration of the Riemann conjecture at the Heidelberg Award Winners Forum. Attias argument was not well received, and many of his colleagues refused to comment publicly. John Baez, a few mathematical physicists willing to comment on Attias proof in real name, said that the proof merely stacked one noticeable claim on another, lacking any relevant or real evidence.

Michael Attia served as President of the Royal Society from 1990 to 1995. As for the death of Attia, Venki Ramakrishnan, the current president of the Royal Society of England, said in his obituary, Sir Michael Attia is a great mathematician who is famous for his contributions in geometry and topology. Because of his work, he has won many awards, especially the Fields Award, the Abel Award and the Copley Award, the highest honor of the Royal Society of England. He is also an outstanding person, as the president of the Royal Society, a true internationalist, and an enthusiastic supporter of Talent Investment - a theme that resonates remarkably today.

Attia tested Riemanns conjecture at Heidelberg Winners Forum.

Michael Atia is an adventurous mathematician. He had challenged and questioned mathematic puzzles again and again in his early years. It is precious that he was not afraid of losing his reputation as a mathematician.

In 2016, Attia was questioned for proving that there is no complex structure on a six-dimensional sphere. In 2017, the 88-year-old told The Times that he had simplified the 255-page proof of Fayte-Thompsons theorem to 12 pages, but 15 experts in the field were skeptical and silent about it, and the proof had not been published in any journal.

Attia, who is nearly 90 years old, expressed an old mans bitterness when she tested Riemanns conjecture at the Heidelberg Winners Forum in 2018. He said to a young questioner, When you get to my age, you will find that people (magazines) wont publish your papers anymore. They will say that you are too old to make mistakes. Its difficult to publish a paper. I even submitted it to arXiv, but they didnt accept it. Atia laments that this is age discrimination. People may only see gender discrimination, but older people will also be discriminated against. And I have been taken for granted as an old man.

Is it worthwhile to risk losing reputation?

To this question, Artea once answered: My reputation was established as a mathematician. If I messed it up now, people would say, Well, hes a good mathematician, but at the end of his life, he lost his mind. One of my friends, John Polkinghorn, said to me on my 80th birthday, You have nothing to lose, but go ahead and think about what you want to think about.

Thats what Ive been doing. Ive got all the medals I need. What else will I lose? Thats why Im taking a risk that a young scholar dares not take.

Artia was born in London, England, on April 22, 1929. His father, Edward Atiyah, was a Lebanese. He studied at Brecinos College, Oxford University. He served the Sudanese government for a long time. His mother, Jean, came from a Scottish family. His parents came from middle-class families. His grandfather was a doctor who emigrated from Lebanon. His grandfather was a priest of the Yorkshire Church.

Because of his fathers work, Michael Atia spent most of his childhood in the Middle East. During the war, he received elementary education and attended Cairos famous Victoria College. Then he went to Alexandria and learned to count in ten languages in an international English boarding school.

When he was 15 years old, he focused on Mathematics and chemistry. He found that chemistry needed to remember a lot of factual information, so he preferred mathematics with only principles and basic ideas. Since then, he has realized that his future lies in mathematics.

In 1945, Michael Arteas family emigrated to England. He first entered Manchester Grammar School and showed his love for geometry. He won the first three places in Trinity College in Cambridge University Entrance Examination. After his military service, he successfully entered Trinity College of Cambridge University (1949-1955). Under the guidance of William VD Hodge, he completed his graduation thesis Some Applications of Topological Methodology in Algebraic Geometry and obtained his doctorate.

In 1955, he married his classmate Lily Brown, who had three children, and his eldest son died at 45. After his marriage, he studied and taught at Princeton Institute of Advanced Studies, Pembroke College, Cambridge University, Oxford University and other academic institutions.

Lily Brown, a PhD student at Mary Cartwright, left a university in London and accompanied her husband to Princeton, where she died in May 2018.

Currently, Michael Attia is an honorary professor at the School of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh. He has also served as president of the Royal Edinburgh Society and the Royal Society of England.

He likes gardening. He is keen on hiking in the mountains of Scotland. He likes cooking, history and classical music.

In addition to the Fields and Abel Awards, Attia has won many other awards, including the Royal Medal of the Royal Society (1968) and the Copley Medal (1988).

He was Knight Bachelor in 1983 and Orderof Merit in 1992.

In addition to research and teaching, Michael Attia served as President of the Royal Society (1990-1995) and President of Master of Trinity College (1990-1997) of Cambridge University. At his initiative, Cambridge University established the Newton Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge, UK, and he was the first director (1990-1996).

In the first decades of research, Michael Attia mainly worked in the field of theoretical mathematics, especially in geometry. By the 1970s, he shifted his focus to physics. The Heidelberg Prize Winner Forum (HLF) evaluated him as an important thinker in quantum field theory.

Appendix: Peng Mei News, September 25, 2018, reports Attia Trial Riemann Conjecture: Im taking a risk that a young scholar dares not take.

Michael Francis Atiyah, 89, has not been the first scientist to make a splash in two years.

In 2016, the 87-year-old winner of the Fields and Abel prizes was questioned for proving that there is no complex structure on a six-dimensional sphere.

In 2017, the 88-year-old told The Times that he had simplified the 255-page proof of Fayte-Thompsons theorem to 12 pages, but 15 experts in the field were skeptical and silent about it, and the proof had not been published in any journal.

Perhaps because of the previous two Oolong incidents, many mathematicians are not optimistic about Attias Riemann Conjecture Proof Speech on September 24. But that did not affect the publics enthusiasm for Riemanns conjecture.

43685 people watch the video of the speech to restore the questioning link on the spot

As of 4.30 p.m. on September 25, 43,685 audiences had watched Arteas speech to prove Riemanns conjecture through the official channel of the Heidelberg Award Winners Forum (HLF).

At the beginning of the speech, Atia said he wanted to dedicate the speech to his wife Lily Brown, who died earlier this year. Lily Brown is a classmate of Attia from Edinburgh.

In previous email communications with the sponsors, Artea promised to present it in a way that non-mathematical audiences could understand. For this reason, he spent a lot of time in his formal speech introducing Riemanns life and reviewing history.

He said of Riemann: He was an important figure in the field of mathematics. His life was very short, but he left behind a masterpiece that had enough influence on later generations.

It was not until the 35th minute of the speech that the much-anticipated Riemann conjecture proof appeared before the audience. Artea used a slide to show how he could prove this great conjecture in the history of mathematics by using counter-evidence.

His proof is based on the work of John von Neumann and Friedrich Hirzebruch, and is closely related to the fine structure constant alpha in physics. In addition, Todd function is also used in his reasoning process.

After the speech, 12 seconds of applause rang from the scene. But when the host asked the audience questions, the audience was silent for about half a minute.

During that time, Artea encouraged two speeches, saying, Comeon! Dont hesitate, be brave!.

I like fairness and want to be asked by a girl and a boy. Who wants to ask first, boys or girls? Its a competition.

Finally, the first questioner appeared.

This is a man who studies AI with a strong Indian accent. He asked Artea: Has this proof solved the Riemann conjecture?

Atia answered, I think it has proved Riemanns conjecture, but this proof has not solved all the problems, it is only the first step in a long way. But the first step is a solution.

He quipped, I can retire. This is your world.

After answering the first mans question, Artea encouraged him to ask questions again. He said that he was a boy just now. Now we need a girl. Dont be shy. Dont let the boy beat you.

He mentioned his wife for the second time: My wife is a competitor. She beat all the boys in high school.

To Atias slight disappointment, the second speaker was a man, and the question put forward hit the sore spot of Atia.

When will you issue this certificate? Lets test it on arXiv, for example?

Attia gave a humorous reply. He pointed to the slide and said, The proof is there!

Laughter rang from the scene. Atia went on to explain that he had written several papers, the longest on fine structure constants, which had been submitted to the Royal Society A journal, but had not yet been published.

The subsequent answer seemed poignant.

He said to the young questioner, When you reach my age, you will find that people (magazines) will not publish your papers. They will say that you are too old to make mistakes. Its difficult to publish a paper. I even submitted it to arXiv, but they didnt accept it.

Atia laments that this is age discrimination. People may only see gender discrimination, but older people will also be discriminated against. And I have been taken for granted as an old man.

I wonder if it is out of the regret of discrimination against women that Atia wants to leave the last two opportunities for girls to ask questions. But time is limited, and only one woman gets the last chance to ask questions.

The lady asked: You said that nobody believed any proof of Riemanns conjecture because nobody had proved it yet. Do you think people will believe your proof? Is it important for you to win peoples trust or bonuses? Or do you care?

Atia answered the question frankly. He said, No, Im concerned about whether people believe this proof or not. He also mentioned that there are two important steps in mathematics or science, the first is creation and the second is communication. If you dont spread your ideas, they wont go anywhere.

Halfway through the answer, Atia suddenly got stuck. After a few seconds of hesitation, he asked the questioner, My short-term memory is missing. Whats your whole question?

After being reminded by the questioner, he quickly remembered the question and answered that people did not believe the proof might be because it was a completely new idea.

At the end of the questioning session, he said, I am very happy that I have found a new idea, a new idea, people should listen to it. If Im just here to talk about old ideas, people can say that Ive tried and it doesnt work. But this is a new idea. People should listen to it.

This is the end of live broadcasting.

Is it worthwhile for you to risk losing your reputation?

In her speech, Artea said that there are two important steps in mathematics or science: creation and communication. He has also been keen to share his ideas.

In December 2015, Attia gave two speeches a day at the University of Edinburgh. For that speech, he hosted a conference called The Beauty of Science in November and was interviewed by Quanta Magazine. Quantum magazine said he was the Pope of Mathematics and matchmaker in Britain, a researcher who could combine mathematics with other fields.

A question asked by Quantum magazine may explain Arteas behavior in recent years - are you at risk of losing your reputation? Is that worth it?

Attia answered, My reputation was established as a mathematician. If I messed it up now, people would say, Well, hes a good mathematician, but at the end of his life, he lost his mind. One of my friends, John Polkinghorne, left the field of physics and became a theologian. On my eightieth birthday, we had a discussion and he said to me, You have nothing to lose, just go ahead and think about what you want to think about. Thats what Ive been doing. Ive got all the medals I need. What else will I lose? Thats why Im taking a risk that a young scholar dares not take.

His presentation is very unlikely to be called a proof of the Riemann conjecture, commented J. rgen Veisdal, an economist at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, on Artias Riemann conjecture proof to Science. Veisdal, who has studied Riemanns conjecture, his proof is too vague and imprecise, said he needed to study Arteas proof more carefully to make a clearer judgment.

Many of Arteas colleagues refused to comment publicly on the matter. John Baez, a mathematical physicist at the University of California, Riverside, is one of the few people willing to comment on Arteas proof in real name. The proof, he said, merely piles up one noticeable claim on another, lacking any relevant argument or real evidence.

Before his speech, Atia wrote an e-mail saying, There are fearless, intelligent young people and knowledgeable elders in the audience. I threw myself to the lion in the hope that I could retreat all over.

Michael Attias most noteworthy achievement was the index heorem he and Isadore Singer of MIT put forward in 1963, which he regarded as his best thing ever done. Based on this achievement, Atia won the Fields Prize in 1966 and the Abel Prize in 2004 with Singh.

I spent my childhood in the Middle East during the war, and at the age of 15 I confirmed my love of mathematics.

According to official data from the Heidelberg Award Winners Forum (HLF) and the University of Edinburgh, Artea was born in London, England, on April 22, 1929, aged 89. His father, Edward Atiyah, a Lebanese, attended the Brecinos College at Oxford University and served the Sudanese government for a long time. His mother, Jean, came from a Scottish family. His parents came from middle-class families. His grandfather was a doctor who emigrated from Lebanon. His grandfather was a priest of the Yorkshire Church.

Because of his fathers work, Michael Atia spent most of his childhood in the Middle East. During the war, he received elementary education and attended Cairos famous Victoria College. Then he went to Alexandria and learned to count in ten languages in an international English boarding school.

When he was 15 years old, he focused on Mathematics and chemistry. He found that chemistry needed to remember a lot of factual information, so he preferred mathematics with only principles and basic ideas. Since then, he has realized that his future lies in mathematics.

In 1945, Michael Arteas family emigrated to England. He first entered Manchester Grammar School and showed his love for geometry. He won the first three places in Trinity College in Cambridge University Entrance Examination. After his military service, he successfully entered Trinity College of Cambridge University (1949-1955). Under the guidance of William VD Hodge, he completed his graduation thesis Some Applications of Topological Methodology in Algebraic Geometry and obtained his doctorate.

In 1955, he married his classmate Lily Brown, who had three children, and his eldest son died at 45. After his marriage, he studied and taught at Princeton Institute of Advanced Studies, Pembroke College, Cambridge University, Oxford University and other academic institutions.

Lily Brown, a PhD student at Mary Cartwright, left a university in London and accompanied her husband to Princeton, where she died in May 2018.

Currently, Michael Attia is an honorary professor at the School of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh. He has also served as president of the Royal Edinburgh Society and the Royal Society of England.

He likes gardening. He is keen on hiking in the mountains of Scotland. He likes cooking, history and classical music.

In addition to the Fields and Abel Awards, Attia has won many other awards, including the Royal Medal of the Royal Society (1968) and the Copley Medal (1988).

He was Knight Bachelor in 1983 and Orderof Merit in 1992.

In addition to research and teaching, Michael Attia served as President of the Royal Society (1990-1995) and President of Master of Trinity College (1990-1997) of Cambridge University. At his initiative, Cambridge University established the Newton Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge, UK, and he was the first director (1990-1996).

In the first decades of research, Michael Attia mainly worked in the field of theoretical mathematics, especially in geometry. By the 1970s, he shifted his focus to physics. The Heidelberg Prize Winner Forum (HLF) evaluated him as an important thinker in quantum field theory.

Source: Responsible Editor of Science Network: Guo Hao_NT5629