The smaller the belly, the smaller the brain? Research: Fat people have smaller gray matter areas than normal people

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 The smaller the belly, the smaller the brain? Research: Fat people have smaller gray matter areas than normal people


The smaller the belly, the smaller the brain? Recent research: Fat people have smaller gray matter areas than normal people (Source: ~)

According to a study released Wednesday (9) by the American Academy of Neurology, excessive abdominal fat (such as beer belly) may be associated with brain atrophy.

Researchers measured body mass index (BMI) to hip-to-waist ratios and found that people who were overweight, obese and had a large waist had smaller brain structures, according to a study published online in the Journal Neurology. However, it is still unclear whether obesity leads to abnormal brain structure or obesity due to abnormal brain structure.

Researchers at Loughborough University tested 9,652 people with an average age of 55. Their weight and brain structure were analyzed. The BMI index found that 19% of people were overweight. The bigger the waist circumference, the smaller the gray matter area of the brain is. The gray matter area nerves are mainly responsible for self-control, muscle control and perception.

Researchers measured the volume of different parts of the brain using magnetic resonance co-seismic scans. Among 1291 overweight and obese subjects, the smallest gray matter volume was found to be 786 cubic centimeters. Compared with normal-weight subjects, the volume of gray matter in the brain was 798 cubic centimeters, which was significantly lower. Current studies have confirmed that brain size is associated with a higher risk of cognitive impairment, but whether overweight and obesity are related to brain size has not yet been determined. Source: Look at the News Responsible Editor: Han Jiapeng_NN9841

Researchers measured the volume of different parts of the brain using magnetic resonance co-seismic scans. Among 1291 overweight and obese subjects, the smallest gray matter volume was found to be 786 cubic centimeters. Compared with normal-weight subjects, the volume of gray matter in the brain was 798 cubic centimeters, which was significantly lower.

Current studies have confirmed that brain size is associated with a higher risk of cognitive impairment, but whether overweight and obesity are related to brain size has not yet been determined.