The 89-year-old British mathematician, Artea, died last year, claiming to have proved Riemanns conjecture.

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 The 89-year-old British mathematician, Artea, died last year, claiming to have proved Riemanns conjecture.


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Sir Michael Francis Atiyah, a mathematician, died at the age of 89, according to an obituary issued by the Royal Society on January 11, local time. Atia claimed in September 2018 that she had proved the Riemann conjecture.

Artea was born in London, England, on April 22, 1929. She is 89 years old. His father, Edward Atiyah, a Lebanese, attended the Brecinos College at Oxford University and served the Sudanese government for a long time. His mother, Jean, came from a Scottish family. His parents came from middle-class families. His grandfather was a doctor who emigrated from Lebanon. His grandfather was a priest of the Yorkshire Church.

Because of his fathers work, Michael Atia spent most of his childhood in the Middle East. During the war, he received elementary education and attended Cairos famous Victoria College. Then he went to Alexandria and learned to count in ten languages in an international English boarding school.

When he was 15 years old, he focused on Mathematics and chemistry. He found that chemistry needed to remember a lot of factual information, so he preferred mathematics with only principles and basic ideas. Since then, he has realized that his future lies in mathematics.

In 1945, Michael Arteas family emigrated to England. He first entered Manchester Grammar School and showed his love for geometry. He won the first three places in Trinity College in Cambridge University Entrance Examination. After his military service, he successfully entered Trinity College of Cambridge University (1949-1955). Under the guidance of William VD Hodge, he completed his graduation thesis Some Applications of Topological Methodology in Algebraic Geometry and obtained his doctorate.

In 1955, he married his classmate Lily Brown, who had three children, and his eldest son died at 45. After his marriage, he studied and taught at Princeton Institute of Advanced Studies, Pembroke College, Cambridge University, Oxford University and other academic institutions.

Lily Brown, a PhD student at Mary Cartwright, left a university in London and accompanied her husband to Princeton, where she died in May 2018.

Currently, Michael Attia is an honorary professor at the School of Mathematics at the University of Edinburgh. He has also served as president of the Royal Edinburgh Society and the Royal Society of England.

He likes gardening. He is keen on hiking in the mountains of Scotland. He likes cooking, history and classical music.

In addition to the Fields and Abel Awards, Attia has won many other awards, including the Royal Medal of the Royal Society (1968) and the Copley Medal (1988).

He was Knight Bachelor in 1983 and Orderof Merit in 1992.

In addition to research and teaching, Michael Attia served as President of the Royal Society (1990-1995) and President of Master of Trinity College (1990-1997) of Cambridge University. At his initiative, Cambridge University established the Newton Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge, UK, and he was the first director (1990-1996). In the first decades of research, Michael Attia mainly worked in the field of theoretical mathematics, especially in geometry. By the 1970s, he shifted his focus to physics. The Heidelberg Prize Winner Forum (HLF) evaluated him as an important thinker in quantum field theory. Source: Wang Fengzhi _NT2541

In addition to research and teaching, Michael Attia served as President of the Royal Society (1990-1995) and President of Master of Trinity College (1990-1997) of Cambridge University. At his initiative, Cambridge University established the Newton Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Cambridge, UK, and he was the first director (1990-1996).

In the first decades of research, Michael Attia mainly worked in the field of theoretical mathematics, especially in geometry. By the 1970s, he shifted his focus to physics. The Heidelberg Prize Winner Forum (HLF) evaluated him as an important thinker in quantum field theory.