International organizations say the seriousness of Yemens civil war has been underestimated and 60,000 people have been killed

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 International organizations say the seriousness of Yemens civil war has been underestimated and 60,000 people have been killed


Yemeni Cemetery (Source: Reuters)

Overseas Network, Dec. 17, recently, the International Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) Armed Conflict Sites and Events Statistics Project (ACLED) said that as of last week, 60,000 people had been killed in Yemens civil war, but a large number of international media still use the old data of 10,000 people killed by the United Nations. ACLED believes that the seriousness of Yemens civil war has been underestimated by the media.

According to Reuters, a new ACLED report shows that more than 60,000 people have been killed in Yemen since January 2016, while an estimated 30,000 people have been killed this year.

Judging from the current international media coverage, most of them cite the data provided by the United Nations on the killing of 10,000 people, which is the only official data since 2016. However, the media has been using this data for a long time, greatly underestimating the devastation of Yemens civil war. Andrea Carboni, an ACLED researcher, said.

Last week, the two sides of Yemens civil war held peace talks in Sweden, but did not express their willingness to cease the war. Shortly after the peace talks, Saudi Arabian-led coalition forces launched a new air strike in the port city of Houdida on the 16th, and Husseins armed forces also said they would retaliate. As a result, the death toll in Yemens civil war will continue to increase.

In addition to the direct deaths caused by war, famine and disease have also caused a large number of deaths among ordinary Yemenis. According to reports, at least 85,000 children under five years of age were starved to death during the civil war. There are also a large number of Yemenis suffering from measles, diphtheria and other diseases. Carl Bernie said.

Source: Overseas Network Responsible Editor: Wang Zheng_N7526