BCI technology may be able to connect brain signals to restore all tactile sensation in amputees.

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 BCI technology may be able to connect brain signals to restore all tactile sensation in amputees.


In recent years, advances in technology have helped millions of amputees and restored their limb use. However, man-made mechanical devices are always limited, because users will never get a complete feeling, which means that many things, such as getting cups, are difficult for them.

Now there are reports that scientists are studying how to use brain-computer interface (BCI) to help patients restore touch. BCI can be used to access the nervous system, Green leaked. There are many similarities between the electronics industry and the nervous system. The whole nervous system of the human body is like a transceiver. In your body, nerve signals can convey movement instructions or alter your physical state, such as changing you from waking to sleeping.

He claims that touch is the most important part of prosthetics because it tells you whether an object is hot or cold, whether it is tense or relaxed, and helps you locate it. Scientists can use BCI to connect areas of the brains tactile function and listen to or send nerve signals.

Green explains how scientists use EEG scanners to understand how the brain sends command signals to perform tasks. Brain discharge patterns can compile neurocoding signals, and each task has different coding patterns. What researchers need to do is convert these signals into language that can be written into a computer to complete the manipulation of limbs.

Green added: Weve seen the introduction of this technology before, but recent developments in the field of artificial nerves have enabled tactile signals to be fed back to the brain. The artificial nervous system will be equipped with sensors to detect fingertip pressure and vibration, and to help users detect target texture and determine the required grip force. (passer by)

Source: Liable Editor of Netease Science and Technology Report: Yao Liwei_NT6056