FAST first discovered millisecond pulsar gravitational wave detection and added new possibilities.

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 FAST first discovered millisecond pulsar gravitational wave detection and added new possibilities.


Xinhua Beijing, Beijing, April (Wang Ying) reporter learned from the National Astronomical Observatory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the heavenly eye FAST (500 meter spherical radio telescope) first discovered millisecond pulsars and recently received international certification, which is another important fruit after FAST secondary pulsars. The newly discovered pulsar J0318+0253 rotation period is 5.19 milliseconds, according to the estimated distance earth about 4000 light years according to the dispersion, the one hour tracking observed by FAST using ultra wideband receiver is one of the weakest high energy millisecond pulsars found so far. According to researchers, by tracking the gamma ray point source 3FGLJ0318.1+0252, FAST first discovered the millisecond pulsar in February 27th and approved the new discovery through international cooperation between FAST and the Fermi Gama - Ray Satellite large field telescope (Fermi-LAT). It is known by the reporter that it is one of the effective ways to discover new pulsars from the high sensitivity of the Fermi-LAT uncertified point source from the radio wave band to confirm the high energy property. Previously, the International Radio Observatory has carried out a number of pulsar searches, such as the three fixed-point observations of the United States Arecibo telescope in June 2013, which have not been detected. The analysis of Fermi-LAT gamma ray data shows that J0318+0253 is an isolated millisecond pulsar and improves the location accuracy to sub second magnitude. This is the first result of the FAST - Fermi-LAT cooperation group. The two sides will continue to cooperate in research and carry out multi band observation and analysis. What is the significance of this discovery? Researchers have explained that millisecond pulsars are special neutron stars that rotate hundreds of times per second. Their research is not only expected to play an important role in understanding the evolution of neutron stars and the state of singular matter, but also the stable millisecond pulsars are low-frequency gravitational waves probes. Pulsar search is the basis of gravitational wave detection. Pulsar timing array is the most effective way to observe gravitational waves generated by super massive double black holes. The pulsar timing array relies on several tens of well timed millisecond pulsars, whose sample enlargement and performance improvement begin with pulsar search. The FAST first discovered millisecond pulsar, demonstrating the potential of FAST to make substantial contributions to international low frequency gravitational wave detection. The FAST project team has planned the FAST multi scientific target and the cruise plan will find a large number of millisecond pulsars, which greatly improves the sensitivity of the pulse star array to detect the gravitational wave. For this discovery, Li Kega, a researcher at the Institute of astronomy and Astrophysics at the Peking University, said the results showed the great potential of FAST in the search for pulsars, highlighting the vitality of the large aperture radio telescope in the new era. The Fast telescope has achieved such a great achievement in the commissioning phase, and looks forward to an early and formal operation to improve the overall strength of Chinas radio astronomy. Xu Renxin, Professor of astronomy at Peking University, also said that in addition to scientific significance, the millisecond pulsar has potential application value. FASTs participation in the discovery of millisecond pulsars will provide better opportunities for scientists and engineers around the world. G.Hobbs, a member of the Australian Industrial Organization, and a member of the international gravitational wave joint exploration Commission (GWIC) said that international radio astronomy is excited by the discovery of a large number of pulsars found by FAST, looking for the prospect of international cooperation in FAST, and looking forward to the contribution of FAST to gravitational wave detection. The National Observatory says that FAST will continue to debug, with a view to achieving design targets, through national acceptance, and becoming a world-class radio astronomical telescope.