After the heart of a pig was transplanted, the baboon survived for 195 days.

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 After the heart of a pig was transplanted, the baboon survived for 195 days.


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Researchers have successfully carried out a revolutionary transracial transplant for baboons. One of the baboons survived for 6 months after being implanted into the pigs heart. This process, called xenotransplantation, refers to the transplantation of organs from one species to another. Experts hope that this technology will one day solve the serious shortage of organ donation worldwide.

The transplanted baboon survived for 195 days, making scientists closer to human organ transplantation experiments. A team of scientists led by BrunoReichart at University of Munich first made genetic modification of pigs donated to the heart, so that their heart tissue would not carry the characteristics of pig heart. This also prevents the baboons immune system from rejecting the heart as a foreign object.

In the study, researchers from Germany, Sweden and Switzerland transplanted pig hearts into 5 baboons. One of the baboons died shortly after surgery, and the other two survived for three months. The remaining two survived 195 days and 182 days before they died. Because of the serious shortage of organ donation worldwide, this study may mean a huge breakthrough in the medical field. Pigs are ideal candidates for human organ transplantation, because their organs, especially heart and kidneys, are very similar to human organs.

The porcine heart has been working for up to 195 days, which is a milestone in the clinical application of cardiac xenotransplantation, the team wrote in the journal Nature. In the past 25 years of research, the survival rate of baboons after xenotransplantation of pig organs is only 57 days, and we have reached this limit only once. But experts say the study is not yet complete. Professor JeremyPearson, of the British Heart Foundation, said: this latest research has brought us closer to porcine heart transplantation to humans. But before the first pig heart transplant to humans, there is still a need for more extensive and long-term research. He was not involved in the study, but he said: Xenotransplantation in humans needs to be taken seriously. Researchers must prove that they are more successful than artificial hearts and ensure that heart transplantation does not transmit viruses to organ recipients, causing potential safety risks. Source: Liable Editor of Netease Scientist: Qiao Junyi_NBJ11279

The porcine heart has been working for up to 195 days, which is a milestone in the clinical application of cardiac xenotransplantation, the team wrote in the journal Nature. In the past 25 years of research, the survival rate of baboons after xenotransplantation of pig organs is only 57 days, and we have reached this limit only once.

But experts say the study is not yet complete. Professor JeremyPearson, of the British Heart Foundation, said: this latest research has brought us closer to porcine heart transplantation to humans. But before the first pig heart transplant to humans, there is still a need for more extensive and long-term research.

He was not involved in the study, but he said: Xenotransplantation in humans needs to be taken seriously. Researchers must prove that they are more successful than artificial hearts and ensure that heart transplantation does not transmit viruses to organ recipients, causing potential safety risks.