Google CEOs Congressional Hearing Denies Search Results Discriminate Conservatives

category:Internet
 Google CEOs Congressional Hearing Denies Search Results Discriminate Conservatives


Today, Google CEOSundar Pichai attended a hearing in Congress. The hearing discussed whether Google search conservative content was discriminated against, data security, false news and hate speech. At present, legislators and the public in the United States are increasingly sceptical about the impact of Silicon Valley on democracy and privacy.

Do search results discriminate against conservatives?

The theme of Tuesdays hearing was Transparency and accountability: reviewing Google and its data collection, use and filtering practices. Many congressmen have argued that Googles search results are not conducive to conservative views.

Trump and Republicans have accused Google and other technology platforms of silencing conservatives since last year. Pichai denies this and repeatedly emphasizes that Googles search algorithm does not support any specific ideology, but reflects the most relevant results, which may be affected by other factors such as user search time and location.

Several congressmen also asked if Google had other types of bias.

According to StatCounter, Google is currently the most popular search engine in the world, with more than 90% market share, but the process of generating search results on the Google platform is complex and opaque. Regulators and competitors like Yelp have criticized Google for displaying its services (such as maps, job postings, business reviews and travel information) through information from other websites. Last year, the European Union fined Google $2.7 billion for monopolizing its search results.

In response, Pichai said that Google provides users with the best experience and the most relevant information and denied that it used discriminatory practices in its search results. When members of Congress asked if Google would support some antitrust legislation, Pichai vaguely said that Google would be willing to participate constructively in any of these areas of legislation.

Data security and hate speech

Members of Congress also asked Pichai about Googles transparency in data collection.

At the hearing, Pichai said that more than 160 million people checked their Google privacy settings last month and that Google wanted to make it easier for ordinary users to control their data.

We always thought there was more work to do, Pichai said. This is an area of continuous effort.

New York Times reported Monday that popular applications such as WeatherBug and GasBuddy track userslocations in incredible detail and then send or sell the data to advertisers and retailers. In addition, compared with iOS, Googles Android operating system has more applications that can closely track userslocations.

The public is paying more and more attention to privacy protection.

Google revealed on Monday that security vulnerabilities allow developers to view 52.5 million Google Plus userspersonal data, even if their personal data is set to private. This is the second Google Plus vulnerability this year.

In his testimony, Pichai acknowledged that under the General Data Protection Regulations (GDP R), which came into force in the European Union earlier this year, companies must disclose personal data leaks within 72 hours of being informed. However, Google had previously insisted that its Google Plus problem was not a violation because it found no evidence of third-party access or abuse of data.

Pichai says consistent global regulation is valuable for companies. In addition, he stressed that this year, Google released its own framework to guide data privacy legislation. Hate speech and misinformation have been mentioned many times. Jamie Raskin of the Maryland House of Representatives cited YouTube videos in particular. The video rumors that Hillary Clinton and other politicians and celebrities are drinking childrens blood. Weve been trying to deal with the wrong information, Pichai said. Google is looking to do more. (Wang Chao)* This article is from Wall Street (Wechat ID: Wallstreetcn). Source: Editor-in-Charge of Wall Street: Wang Fengzhi_NT2541

Pichai says consistent global regulation is valuable for companies. In addition, he stressed that this year, Google released its own framework to guide data privacy legislation.

Hate speech and misinformation have been mentioned many times. Jamie Raskin of the Maryland House of Representatives cited YouTube videos in particular. The video rumors that Hillary Clinton and other politicians and celebrities are drinking childrens blood.

Weve been trying to deal with the wrong information, Pichai said. Google is looking to do more. (Wang Chao)

* This article is from Wall Street (Wechat ID: Wallstreetcn).