Stanford University Professors Mourning for Zhang Shoushengs Death: A Great Loss in Academia

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 Stanford University Professors Mourning for Zhang Shoushengs Death: A Great Loss in Academia


Steven said in an e-mail that Zhang Shousheng is an interdisciplinary leader who has made outstanding contributions to theoretical physics for a long time. He uses mathematical methods to solve complex practical problems, has made many pioneering contributions in the field of research, and has guided many students. His death is an indescribable loss to all.

Zhang Shousheng died on December 1. He was 55 years old. In 2007, the quantum spin Hall effect discovered by Zhang Shousheng was ranked as one of the ten most important scientific breakthroughs in the world by Science magazine. Zhang Shousheng is an academician of the American Academy of Sciences and a foreign academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Steven Kifferson is an American theoretical physicist, known for his several important contributions to condensed matter physics. He is currently a professor of physics at Stanford Universitys Prabhu Goel Family School of Humanities and Sciences. Before joining Stanford University in 2004, he was a professor of physics at the University of California, Los Angeles.

The following is the full text of the mourning mail:

Dear colleagues:

Last Saturday night, our colleague Zhang Shousheng died suddenly.

This is a huge loss. Shousheng is an interdisciplinary leader who has made outstanding contributions to theoretical physics for a long time. His pursuit of truth and elegant mathematical methods to solve complex practical problems (problems beyond physics and physics), his guidance to many intelligent students and academic literature, and many of his pioneering contributions in the field of research will be inscribed on his monument.

Like many of you, I have lost a close friend. His passion for new things is very infectious, and his love for exploring various disciplines and academics is reunited with the end of his tragedy. Those of you who know him will also remember his close and loving relationship with his family and his proud children, Brian and Stephanie. Of course, there are his plum, bamboo, horse and lifelong love, Barbara. With regard to the death of Shousheng, I will also attach the following description of his close relatives:

This is an indescribable loss for all of us, and we will let you know when more information is disclosed. Because we are all trying to deal with this painful news. Stanford Universitys Psychological Counseling Service Center, Staff Assistance Center, Post-doctoral Affairs Center, and Religious Life Office will provide assistance and support.

Please lend a helping hand to support the people around you.

Painful,

Steven Kifferson

Professor Zhang Shousheng:

Zhang Shousheng, born in Gaoyou, Jiangsu Province, was admitted to Fudan University in 1978. In 1980, he went to Berlin Free University, Germany to study abroad, and received his masters degree in 1983. Later, he went to the State University of New York, Stony Brook, USA for further study and received his doctorate degree in 1987. After graduation, he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Later, he went to IBM as a senior researcher. He has taught at Stanford University since 1993. In 1999, he was appointed as lecturer professor of Changjiang scholars and guest professor of Institute of Higher Education of Tsinghua University. He was appointed Director of IBM-Stanford Spintronics Research Center in 2004.

In 1992, he was awarded the Outstanding Young Scientist Award of the Global Chinese Physics Society and the Outstanding Innovation Award of IBM Research Department in 1993. Because of his outstanding contributions in the field of topological insulators, he has won the Guggenheim Foundation Award (2007), Humboldt Research Award (2009), European Physics Award (2010), Gutenberg Research Award (2010), Seeking Truth Award for Outstanding Scientists (2011), Oliver Buckley Condensate Physics Award (2012). Dirac Medal (2012) Basic Physics Award Advanced Physics Award (2013) and other awards. He won the Thomson Reuters Citation Laureate Prize in 2014 and is regarded as a strong candidate for the Nobel Prize in Physics.

He was also a member of the American Physical Society (2006), a member of the National Thousand People Program of China in 2009, an academician of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2011) [4] [7], a foreign academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (2013), and an academician of the National Academy of Sciences (2015).

The quantum spin Hall effect proposed by his research team in 2006 was named one of the ten most important scientific breakthroughs in the world by Science in 2007.

On March 15, 2013, Beijing Time, Science published an online article announcing that a team led by Academician Xue Qikun of the Chinese Academy of Sciences had discovered quantum anomalous Hall effect for the first time in experiments. (The team led by Academician Xue Qikun of the Chinese Academy of Sciences includes Xue Qikun, Wang Yayu, Chen Xi, Jia Jinfeng of the Department of Physics of Tsinghua University, He Ke, Ma Xucun, Wang Lili, Lu Li, Fang Zhong, Dai Xi and Zhang Shousheng of Stanford University/Tsinghua University, etc.

Source: Responsible Editor of Netease Science and Technology Report: Qiao Junyi_NBJ11279